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60th session - Decisions

Ante Štambuk building at the corner of Tito Street and no. 8 Kulovića Street, the historic building

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Status of monument -> National monument

Published in the Official Gazette of BiH, no. 13/11.

Pursuant to Article V para. 4 Annex 8 of the General Framework Agreement for Peace in Bosnia and Herzegovina and Article 39 para. 1 of the Rules of Procedure of the Commission to Preserve National Monuments, at a session held on 26 October 2010 the Commission adopted a

 

D E C I S I O N

 

I

 

The historic Ante Štambuk building at the corner of Tito Street and no. 8 Kulovića Street in Sarajevo is hereby designated as a National Monument of Bosnia and Herzegovina (hereinafter: the National Monument).

The National Monument is located on a site designated as cadastral plot no. 1824, cadastral municipality Sarajevo IV (new survey), corresponding to c.p. no. 187, c.m. Sarajevo XXXIX (old survey); Land Register entry no. 282, Municipality Centar, Sarajevo, Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bosnia and Herzegovina.

The provisions relating to protection measures set forth by the Law on the Implementation of the Decisions of the Commission to Preserve National Monuments, established pursuant to Annex 8 of the General Framework Agreement for Peace in Bosnia and Herzegovina (Official Gazette of the Federation of BiH nos. 2/02, 27/02, 6/04 and 51/07) shall apply to the National Monument.

 

II

 

The Government of the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina (hereinafter: the Government of the Federation) shall be responsible for providing the legal, scientific, technical, administrative and financial measures necessary for the protection, conservation,  restoration and presentation of the National Monument.

The Commission to Preserve National Monuments (hereinafter: the Commission) shall determine the technical requirements and secure the funds for preparing and setting up signboards with basic details of the monument and the Decision to proclaim the property a National Monument.

 

III

           

To ensure the on-going protection of the National Monument on the area defined in Clause 1 para. 2 of this Decision, the following protection measures are hereby stipulated:

-          all works are prohibited other than conservation-restoration works, remedial works, and works designed to display the monument, subject to the approval of the Federal Ministry responsible for regional planning (hereinafter: the relevant ministry) and under the expert supervision of the heritage protection authority of the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina (hereinafter: the heritage protection authority);

-          during restoration works the original appearance of the building shall be preserved;

-          the adaptation of the premises to bring them into conformity with modern needs (installation of central heating and other interior works) shall be permitted provided that the stylistic features of the building are preserved, and subject to the approval of the relevant ministry and under the expert supervision of the heritage protection authority;

-          the building may be adapted for residential, commercial, educational and cultural use in a manner that will not compromise the integrity of the building and its meaning in the townscape.

 

IV

 

All executive and area development planning acts are hereby revoked to the extent that they are not in accordance with the provisions of this Decision.

 

V

 

Everyone, and in particular the competent authorities of the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina, the Canton, and urban and municipal authorities, shall refrain from any action that might damage the National Monument or jeopardize the preservation thereof.

 

VI

 

The Government of the Federation, the relevant ministry, the heritage protection authority, and the Municipal Authorities in charge of urban planning and land registry affairs, shall be notified of this Decision in order to carry out the measures stipulated in Articles II to V of this Decision, and the Authorized Municipal Court shall be notified for the purposes of registration in the Land Register.

 

VII

 

The elucidation and accompanying documentation form an integral part of this Decision, which may be viewed by interested parties on the premises or by accessing the website of the Commission (http://www.kons.gov.ba) 

 

VIII

 

Pursuant to Art. V para 4 Annex 8 of the General Framework Agreement for Peace in Bosnia and Herzegovina, decisions of the Commission are final.

 

IX

 

This Decision shall enter into force on the day following its publication in the Official Gazette of BiH.

 

This Decision has been adopted by the following members of the Commission: Zeynep Ahunbay, Martin Cherry, Amra Hadžimuhamedović, Dubravko Lovrenović and Ljiljana Ševo.

           

No.:07.3-02.3-71/10-20  

26 October 2010

Sarajevo                                                                                                                                                                                            

 

Chair of the Commission

Amra Hadžimuhamedović

 

E l u c i d a t i o n

 

I – INTRODUCTION

Pursuant to Article 2, paragraph 1 of the Law on the Implementation of the Decisions of the Commission to Preserve National Monuments, established pursuant to Annex 8 of the General Framework Agreement for Peace in Bosnia and Herzegovina, a “National Monument” is an item of public property proclaimed by the Commission to Preserve National Monuments to be a National Monument pursuant to Articles V and VI of Annex 8 of the General Framework Agreement for Peace in Bosnia and Herzegovina  and property entered on the Provisional List of National Monuments of Bosnia and Herzegovina (Official Gazette of BiH no. 33/02) until the Commission reaches a final decision on its status, as to which there is no time limit and regardless of whether a petition for the property in question has been submitted or not.

The Ante Štambuk building at the corner of Tito Street and no. 8 Kulovića Street in Sarajevo is on the Provisional List of National Monuments as part of item 546 under the heading “Urban Townscape of Sarajevo.”

Pursuant to the provisions of the law, the Commission proceeded to carry out the procedure for reaching a final decision to designate the property as a national monument, pursuant to Article V para. 4 of Annex 8 and Article 35 of the Rules of Procedure of the Commission to Preserve National Monuments.

 

Statement of Significance

The Ante Štambuk building is of considerable townscape and documentary value concerning the Austro-Hungarian period.  It forms part of one of Sarajevo’s most important urban townscapes – Tito Street. It has retained its combined residential and commercial use throughout, is in very good structural condition, and is maintained to exemplary standards, including the conservation-restoration works on the façades.

 

II – PRELIMINARY PROCEDURE

In the procedure preceding the adoption of a final decision to proclaim the property a national monument, the following documentation was inspected:

-          Documentation on the location of the property and the current owner and occupant.

-          Details of legal protection to date.

-          Data on the current condition and use of the property, including a description and photographs, data of war damage, data on restoration or other works on the property, etc.

-          Historical, architectural and other documentary material on the property, as set out in the bibliography forming part of this Decision.

 

Pursuant to Article 12 of the Law on the Implementation of Decisions of the Commission to Preserve National Monuments Established Pursuant to Annex 8 of the General Framework Agreement for Peace in Bosnia and Herzegovina, the following procedures were carried out for the purpose of designating the property as a national monument of Bosnia and Herzegovina:

-          A letter ref. 07.3 – 35.2-10/10-108 of 09.07.2010 requesting documentation and views on the designation of the Ante Štambuk building on the corner of Tito Street and no. 8 Kulovića Street in Sarajevo was sent to the Archives of BiH, the Construction Authority of Sarajevo Canton, the Institute for the Protection of the Cultural, Historical and Natural Heritage of Sarajevo Canton, the Development Planning Authority of Sarajevo Canton, Centar Municipality and the Institute for the Protection of Monuments of the Federal Ministry of Culture and Sport.

-          The property is in state ownership, and Centar Municipality has not responded in writing with its views concerning the designation of the property as a national monument.

 

The findings based on the review of the above documentation and the condition of the site are as follows:

 

1. Details of the property

Location

The Ante Štambuk building is in the centre of Sarajevo, on the south side of Tito Street at the intersection with Kulovića Street at no. 8, where the main entrance is situated. To the east the building adjoins the Salom mansion(1); it faces the National Bank on the opposite side of Tito Street(2).

The National Monument is located on a site designated as cadastral plot no. 1824, cadastral municipality Sarajevo IV (new survey), corresponding to c.p. no. 187, c.m. Sarajevo XXXIX (old survey); Land Register entry no. 282, Municipality Centar, Sarajevo, Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Historical background

Tito Street took shape along an ancient road dating back to Roman times. During the Ottoman period it was not a single street, but was divided into a number of sections each of which had its own name. The section of Tito street east of the National Bank as far as the Gazi husrev-bey hammam, where the Ante Štambuk building is located, was known in the early days as the Čemaluša mahala and sokak (lane), after the hojja Kemaluddin (Čemaludin), who built a mosque in the 16th century on the site of the present-day skyscraper in Ferhadija street(3); this name would remain unchanged until 1914.

The Ante Štambuk building was erected in the first decade of the 20th century, in the final stages of the Austro-Hungarian period, when many buildings in Sarajevo were designed and executed in the Secessionist style. The plot on which the building was erected was Karl Holzer until 1903, when it was purchased from him by Ante Štambuk.

The building was designed by Josip Vancaš(4) in 1905, and was built to an amended design of 1907(5). In the original design, the architect followed the 1893 Building Regulations, which prescribed that buildings in Čemaluša Street consist of three storeys (ground and two upper floors). The altered design of 1907 made provision on the first floor for the Social Premises of the Croatian Club. When making these changes, Vancaš added another storey to the building along with a mansard facing present-day Tito Street(6).   

In 1917, during World War I, the owner, Ante Štambuk, sold the building to the Peško family, who sold it in 1933, during the interwar period, to the Trebić family(7).

The building suffered no particular damage during World War II. It was nationalized in the early 1960s, but its mixed commercial and residential use remained unchanged. During the 1992-1995 war in Bosnia and Herzegovina, the façades of the building were damaged by shelling, but none of the damage was such as to compromise the structural stability of the building. In 2006, conservation-restoration works were carried out on the street fronts of the building, which is still in mixed commercial and residential use.

 

2. Description of the property 

The Ante Štambuk building is one of many mixed-use rental buildings in a row(8), built as infill in an already built-up area during the Austro-Hungarian period.

As regards its stylistic features, the building is in the Secessionist style. It is a corner building, roughly rectangular in plan, measuring 30.00 x 15.00 m, with a height of 14.00 m. It has six storeys – basement, ground floor, three upper floors and a mansard – and is 19.20 m in height. Functionally, it consists of the ground floor intended for commercial use, and upper storeys originally designed solely for residential use.

The main entrance is to the west, facing Kulovića Street, where there is a double-valved door of 160 x 280 cm giving onto a longitudinal storm porch of 180 x 590 cm leading into the stairwell, which measures 450 x 600 cm and contains a triple-flight spiral staircase 130 cm in width rising through all five storeys. The entrance to the basement, of 100 x 220 cm, is also in the stairwell at ground-floor level, separated from the rest of the stairwell by a steel railing.

The ground floor also has four entrances to the commercial premises. To the north, facing Tito Street, are shop windows with two entrances to a small supermarket with a total area of 208 m2. To the west, facing Kulovića Street, are two entrances to commercial premises each with an area of 38m2(9).

The first and second floors each contain two flats, north and south, entered from the stairwell landings. The flats to the north are larger, at 185 m2, than those to the south, of 115 m2, but the interior layout is similar. The front doors to the flats are double-valved wooden doors of 130 x 280 cm opening onto a long central corridor 160 cm in width. The interconnecting reception rooms are to the west and north, facing Kulovića and Tito streets respectively, while the service quarters are to the east, facing onto the light well.

The flats to the north, at the intersection of the two streets, have three rooms to the north, all 550 cm wide and ranging in length from 450 to 465 cm, while to the west are another two rooms of the same width and 340 cm and 510 cm long respectively. To the east are a kitchen of 485 x 285 cm with a larder and loggia, and a bathroom of 255 x 230 cm with a separate toilet(10). 

            The flats to the south, overlooking Kulovića Street, have three rooms(11) all 550 cm wide and ranging in length from290 to 540 cm. To the east is a kitchen of 460 x 260 cm, a bathroom of 320 x 290 cm and a toilet of 140 x 290 cm.

The third floor has two smaller flats to the south and north. The mansard is used for storage purposes only.

As regards the treatment of the façades, the building is in the Secessionist style. The façades are symmetrical in composition, with pronounced string courses, cornices and tertiary mouldings. The two-light windows are rectangular with overlights, measuring 114 x 220 cm overall.

The west façade is articulated horizontally by moulded string courses over the ground and second floors, and vertically by shallow risalits to the side, rising above the central section of the façade.

The first and second floors each have ranks of eight two-light windows. On the second floor, at window parapet level, are biomorphic relief decorations typical of the Secession, while the first floor features linear mouldings forming a horizontal band 130 cm in height broken by the window openings. On the third floor, there is a single window at each end, of the same width and 190 cm in height, the top of which is framed by a façade band with floral motifs and Secessionist mouldings to the side.

On the ground floor are seven shop windows in the axes of the upper windows, all 4.20 m high and ranging in width from 1.60 to 2.30 m, along with a double-valved entrance portal with overlight, measuring 1.60 x 2.80 m, giving onto the residential quarters.

The south façade differs from the west in that the third floor extends the full width of the building, and in its central mansard. The string course over the second floor is broken in the central section by two vertical bands 1.40 m in width. There are four two-light windows on the first floor, and three two-light windows and two single-light windows on the second floor, together with a semi-elliptical balcony 4.10 m in width resting on a central console in the form of a volute. The third floor has three two-light windows of varying widths and six single-light windows. The mansard in the central section has one two-light opening and two single-light openings with a height of 85 cm.

In terms of construction and materials, the building was erected in compliance with the provisions of the 1893 Building Regulations, which set high standards for the use of building materials. The building has bearing and outer walls 80 cm thick at ground-floor level, and interior walls 30 and 15 cm thick. The bearing walls diminish in thickness as they rise through the building. The structural system consists of a combination of longitudinal and transverse bearing walls set 5.50 m apart.

The ceiling over the basement is a brick vault resting on steel cross-beams. The ceiling joists of the storeys above are wooden. The stone staircase is cantilevered, with wrought iron railings and wooden handrails. The original front doors of the flats, like the exterior woodwork, were of good quality timber.

The ground floor ceiling is 4.50 m high, those of the first and second floors are 3.60 m high, and the third floor ceiling is 2.90 m high. The interfloor structure is 50 cm thick. The roof trusses are wooden, and the roof is mainly clad with tiles; part of the roof is clad with galvanized iron.

 

3. Legal status to date

The Ante Štambuk building in Sarajevo forms part of the Urban Townscape of Sarajevo, which is on the Provisional List of National Monuments under serial no. 546.

According to the Institute for the Protection of Monuments of the Federal Ministry of Culture and Sport, the Ante Štambuk building is on the “List of Recorded, Provisionally Protected and Protected Immovable Cultural Monuments and Natural Heritage of Sarajevo Canton” under item 12, Austro-Hungarian period. The historic building is on the list, but is not on the register of cultural monuments(12).

The Ante Štambuk building on the corner of Kulovića and Tito streets is on the “List of Recorded, Provisionally Protected and Protected Immovable Cultural Monuments and Natural Heritage of Sarajevo Canton” under item 4, Marshal Tito Street, section 5.2.02, “Mixed use buildings,” Austro-Hungarian period. The historic building is on the list, but is not on the register of cultural monuments

The building lies within the boundary of the “Kvadrant Sirano – Pozorište mladih” urban plan (Official Gazette of Sarajevo Canton no. 25/03), which provides for the building to retain its existing footprint and height, but to be opened up at ground-floor level to create a pedestrian passageway between Branilaca grada and Tito streets. The premises along the passageway or arcade are to be used for commercial purposes only(13).

The Decision on the implementation of the “Kvadrant Sirano – Pozorište mladih” urban plan sets out the planning and technical conditions that pertain, among others, to the Ante Štambuk building in Sarajevo. Interventions to the façades in Tito and Ferhadija streets may be allowed on the basis of the outline project for the refurbishment of Tito Street. All interventions to the various buildings must be approved solely on the basis of these conditions and of a suitable project drawn up by the Institute for the Protection of the Cultural and Historical Heritage of Sarajevo Canton(14). 

 

4. Research and conservation-restoration works

In 1907 the design for the Ante Štambuk building at the intersection of Tito Street and no. 8 Kulovića Street was amended to provide premises for the Croatian Club in the northern part of the first floor(15).

Up to the end of World War II, the building was kept regularly maintained. During the latter half of the 20th century the occupants adapted the bathrooms, toilets and kitchens, and the Croatian Club premises were converted into a flat.

After the 1992-1995 war in Bosnia and Herzegovina a number of the flats were converted from residential to commercial use, without requiring any significant building works.

In 2006, conservation-restoration works were carried out on the street façades by the Cantonal Institute for the Protection of the Cultural and Natural Heritage(16). At the same time, remedial works were carried out on the damaged roof structure and cladding, the balcony floor was made good, and the console supporting the balcony was reconstructed. Routine maintenance works of the common parts (stairwell) were carried out separately.

 

5. Current condition of the property

The Ante Štambuk building in Sarajevo is in very good structural condition and, following the conservation-restoration works of 2006, has been made weatherproof. Most of the exterior and interior woodwork is in a very good state of preservation, with the exception of the woodwork of the ground-floor commercial premises, which has been removed and replaced by aluminium.

 

6. Specific risks

There are no significant specific risks associated with the Ante Štambuk building in Sarajevo.

 

III – CONCLUSION

Applying the Criteria for the adoption of a decision on proclaiming an item of property a national monument (Official Gazette of BiH nos. 33/02 and 15/03), the Commission has enacted the Decision cited above.

The Decision was based on the following criteria:

A.         Time frame

C.         Artistic and aesthetic value

C.i.       quality of workmanship

C.ii.      quality of materials        

C.iii.      proportions

C.iv.      composition

C.v.       value of details

D.         Clarity

D.iii.      work of a major artist or builder

F.         Townscape value

F.ii.       meaning in the townscape

F.iii.      the building or group of buildings is part of a group or site

G.         Authenticity

G.i.       form and design

G.ii.      material and content

G.iii.     use and function

G.v.      location and setting

I.          Completeness

I.          physical coherence

I.ii.        homogeneity

I.iii.       completeness

I.iv.       undamaged condition

 

The following documents form an integral part of this Decision:

-          Ownership documentation

-         Copy of cadastral plan for c.p. no. 1824, c.m. Sarajevo IV (new survey), title deed no. 727, plan no. Sarajevo - 148; scale 1:1000 (old survey c.p. no. 187, c.m.. Sarajevo XXXIX), issued on 14.07.2010 by the Department of Proprietary Rights, Geodetics and Cadastral Affairs, Centar Municipality, Sarajevo Canton, Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bosnia and Herzegovina.

-         Land Register entry for plot no. 187, c.m. Sarajevo XXXIX, Land Register entry no.282 (old survey), no. 065-0-NarII-01a0-42694 of 15.07.2010, issued by the Land Registry Office of the Municipal Court in Sarajevo, Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bosnia and Herzegovina.

-          Documentation on previous protection of the property

-         Letter from the Institute for the Protection of Monuments of the Federal Ministry of Culture and Sport no. 07-40-4-2905-1/10 of 16.07.2010.

-         Letter from the Development Planning Authority of Sarajevo Canton no. 02-23-4359/10 of 20.07.2010.

-         Excerpt from the urban plan “Kvadrant Sirano – Pozorište mladih” (Official Gazette of Sarajevo Canton no. 25/03), Sarajevo 2003.

-         Letter from the Development Planning Authority of Sarajevo Canton no. 02-23-4359/10 of 20.07.2010.

-          Photodocumentation

-         Historical photographs of present-day Tito Street and the Ante Štambuk building taken in 1912 – photographic collection of the Trebić family, Sarajevo, July 2010.

-         Historical photographs of present-day Tito Street and the Ante Štambuk building – SDC Sarajevo, Sarajevo, July 2010.

-         Photographs of the south front of the Ante Štambuk building at the corner of Tito Street and no. 8 Kulovića Street in Sarajevo taken in the 1990s (Jela Božić. Arhitekt Josip pl. Vancaš, značaj i doprinos arhitekturi Sarajeva u periodu austrougarske uprave, doctoral dissertation. Sarajevo: Faculty of Architecture, Sarajevo, 1989).

-         Photographs of the exterior of the Ante Štambuk building at the corner of Tito Street and no. 8 Kulovića Street in Sarajevo taken in October 2007 by architect Adi Ćorović using Sony DSC – H10 digital camera.

-         Photographs of the interior and exterior of the Ante Štambuk building at the corner of Tito Street and no. 8 Kulovića Street in Sarajevo taken on 16 July 2010 by architect Adi Ćorović using Sony DSC – H10 digital camera.

-          Technical documentation

-         Original drawings by Josip Vancaš, 1905 and 1907. Jela Božić. Arhitekt Josip pl. Vancaš, značaj i doprinos arhitekturi Sarajeva u periodu austrougarske uprave – doctoral dissertation, Sarajevo, Faculty of Architecture, 1989.

-         Nermina Nanić and Zaila Uzunović, Main project for the restoration of the façades in Marshal Tito Street –Ante Štambuk mixed-use building, no. 8 Kulovića Street. Sarajevo: Cantonal Institute for the Protection of the Cultural, Historical and Natural Heritage of Sarajevo, May 2006.

-         Drawings of the Ante Štambuk building at the corner of Tito Street and no. 8 Kulovića Street in Sarajevo by architect Igor Palinić, July 2010.

 

Bibliography

During the procedure to designate the property as a national monument the following works were consulted:

 

1987     Krzović, Ibrahim. Arhitektura Bosne i Hercegovine, 1878 -1918 (Architecture of BiH 1878-1918). Sarajevo: Art Gallery of BiH, 1987

 

1988     Spasojević, Borislav. Arhitektura stambenih palata austrougarskog perioda u Sarajevu (Architecture of Austro-Hungarian period mansion blocks in Sarajevo). Sarajevo: Svjetlost, 1988

 

1989     Božić, Jela. Arhitekt Josip pl. Vancaš, značaj i doprinos arhitekturi Sarajeva u periodu austrougarske uprave (Architect the Hon. Josip Vancaš, significance and contribution to the architecture of Sarajevo in the Austro-Hungarian period), doctoral dissertation. Sarajevo: Faculty of Architecture, 1989

 

1998     Kurto, Nedžad. Arhitektura Bosne i Hercegovine – Razvoj bosanskog stila (Architecture of BiH – development of the Bosnian style). Sarajevo: Sarajevo Publishing, 1998

 

2004     Krzović, Ibrahim. Arhitektura Secesije u Bosni i Hercegovini (Architecture of the Secession in BiH). Sarajevo: Kulturno naslijeđe, 2004

 

2007     Zlatar, B., M. Ganibegović, Š. Gavranović, V. Žujo. Sarajevo, ulice, trgovi, mostovi, parkovi i spomenici – općina Centar (Sarajevo, streets, squares, bridges, parks and monuments: Centar Municipality). Sarajevo: Mediapress, 2007

 

2008     Decision designating the Salom mansion in Sarajevo as a national monument, adopted at a session of the Commission to Preserve National Monuments held in Sarajevo from 29 January to 4 February 2008

 

2009     Decision designating the National (Central) Bank building in Sarajevo as a national monument adopted at a session of the Commission to Preserve National Monuments held in Sarajevo from 1 to 4 December 2009.

 

(1) Decision designating the Salom mansion in Sarajevo as a national monument, adopted at a session of the Commission to Preserve National Monuments held in Sarajevo from 29 January to 4 February 2008.

(2) Decision designating the National (Central) Bank building in Sarajevo as a national monument adopted at a session of the Commission to Preserve National Monuments held in Sarajevo from 1 to 4 December 2009.

(3) The eastern half of Tito Street, from present-day Kaptol Street to the Cathedral, was also known as Gornja [Upper] Čemaluša. Present-day Marshal Tito Street includes only part of this stretch. Since 1993 the stretch from the National Bank eastwards to the Eternal Flame has retained the name Marshal Tito Street, while the stretch east of the Eternal Flame, which bore the same name from 1946 to 1993, was renamed Mula Mustafe Bašeskije Street, after the city’s most famous chronicler. – B. Zlatar, M. Ganibegović, Š. Gavranović, V. Žujo, Sarajevo, ulice, trgovi, mostovi, parkovi i spomenici – općina Centar, Sarajevo: Mediapress, 2007, 75 and 76.

(4) Ibrahim Krzović, Arhitektura Secesije u BiH, Sarajevo: Sarajevo Publishing, 2004, 77 and 78.

(5) N. Kurto, Arhitektura Bosne i Hercegovine – Razvoj Bosanskog stila, Sarajevo: Kulturno naslijeđe, 1998, 380.

(6) Nermina Nanić and Zaila Uzunović, Glavni projekat restauracije fasade – Ulični niz ulica Maršala Tita. Stambeno-poslovna zgrada Ante Štambuka, Kulovića ulica broj 8, Sarajevo: Cantonal Institute for the Protection of the Cultural, Historical and Natural Heritage of Sarajevo, May 2006

(7) Ibrahim Krzović, Arhitektura Bosne i Hercegovine, 1878.-1918, Sarajevo: Art Gallery BiH, 1987, table no.. 134, p. 217

(8) New types of residential properties came into being in the Austro-Hungarian period: villas, rental buildings, mansions, hotels and social-welfare buildings. Most rental buildings were built in a row, as a block, or as a detached building. Rental buildings usually had two flats entered from the stairwell. As a rule, one room would have a separate entrance from the stairwell for subtenants, and would be provided with all the mod cons of the day (electric lighting, mains plumbing). Each flat also had a fuel store in the basement or a shed in the courtyard. – Borislav Spasojević, op.cit, 1988, 25.

(9) One of the commercial premises has a double-valved door opening  onto the inner stairwell

(10) With the exception of the first-floor flat, where the kitchen, larger, loggia and part of the corridor have been knocked into a single large room of 635 x 415 cm, and the bathroom reduced in size, with a second toilet added.

(11) The room to the north has a single-valved door opening straight onto the stairwell landing. This room would originally have been let to subtenants

(12) Translator’s note: part of this paragraph is missing in the original, and has been reconstructed from the corresponding paragraph in the Decision designating the Danon building.

(13) Letter from the Sarajevo Canton Development Planning Authority no.02-23-4359/10 of 20.07.2010.

(14) Decision on the implementation of the “Kvadrant Sirano – Pozorište mladih” urban plan, article 5, Sarajevo 2003. – Letter from the Sarajevo Canton Development Planning Authority no. 02-23-4359/10 of 20.07.2010.

(15) Jela Božić, Arhitekt Josip pl. Vancaš, značaj i doprinos arhitekturi Sarajeva u periodu austrougarske uprave, Doctoral dissertation, Sarajevo: Faculty of Architecture in Sarajevo, 1989, 245.

(16) Nermina Nanić and Zaila Uzunović, Glavni projekat restauracije fasade – Ulični niz ulica Maršala Tita. Stambeno-poslovna zgrada Ante Štambuka, Kulovića ulica broj 8, Sarajevo: Cantonal Institute for the Protection of the Cultural, Historical and Natural Heritage of Sarajevo, May 2006



Ante Štambuk buildingAnte Štambuk building, Eighties of the twentieth century Sarajevo – The corner of Titova and Kulovića street  Northern facade
Northern facade, detail - balcony Western facadeWestern facade, entranceWestern facade, window
Interior, ground floor - staircaseStaircase  


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