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Decisions on Designation of Properties as National Monuments

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60th session - Decisions

Holdings and collections of the Historical Archives of Sarajevo, the movable property

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Status of monument -> National monument

Published in the “Official Gazette of BiH”, no. 1/10.

Pursuant to Article V para. 4 Annex 8 of the General Framework Agreement for Peace in Bosnia and Herzegovina and Article 39 para. 1 of the Rules of Procedure of the Commission to Preserve National Monuments, at a session held from 7 to 10 July 2009 the Commission adopted a

 

D E C I S I O N

 

I

 

The movable property of the holdings and collections of the Historical Archive in Sarajevo is hereby designated as a National Monument of Bosnia and Herzegovina (hereinafter: the National Monument).

The National Monument consists of archive material systematized into nine groups:

1. Collections and holdings in oriental languages

2. The administration

3. The judiciary

4. Education, science and culture

5. Health-care and social policy

6. The economy

7. Socio-political organizations

8. Family and personal holdings

9. Collections

The National Monument is housed in the following premises: no. 19 Alipašina St., no. 90 Čadordžina St. (storerooms), and no. 13 Ferhadija St. (storerooms) in Sarajevo, Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bosnia and Herzegovina.

The provisions relating to protection measures set forth by the Law on the Implementation of the Decisions of the Commission to Preserve National Monuments, established pursuant to Annex 8 of the General Framework Agreement for Peace in Bosnia and Herzegovina (Official Gazette of the Federation of BiH nos. 2/02, 27/02, 6/04 and 51/07) shall apply to the National Monument.

 

II

 

The Government of the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina (hereinafter: the Government of the Federation) shall be responsible for providing the legal, scientific, technical, administrative and financial measures necessary for the protection, conservation, restoration, rehabilitation and presentation of the National Monument.

The Commission to Preserve National Monuments (hereinafter: the Commission) shall determine the technical requirements and secure the funds for preparing and setting up signboards with basic details of the monument and the Decision to proclaim the property a National Monument.

 

III

 

To ensure the on-going protection of the National Monument, the Government of the Federation shall provide suitable physical and technical conditions for the safekeeping of the National Monument, to include:

-       the adaptation of the storerooms at no. 90 Čadordžina St.;

-       the procurement of archive equipment and facilities in line with international archive standards;

-       the provision of suitable conditions for safeguarding the archive material to prevent its further deterioration and of the conditions and resources required for conservation and restoration works on the archive and library material;

-       the establishment and equipping of a laboratory for the conservation and restoration of the archive and library material;

-       the establishment and equipping of a strongroom for the safeguarding of the most representative archive and library material;

-       the digitalization and microfilming of the archive and library material;

-       hybrid archiving;

-       the installation of air conditioning to provide optimal humidity levels (50% to 60%) and ambient temperature (16° to 22°C) in the premises where the archive and library material is housed;

-       the installation of video surveillance cameras and a fire protection system;

-       drawing up a plan for the provision of permanent accommodation for the archive holdings and collections.

 

IV

 

The Government of the Federation shall provide suitable physical and technical conditions for the safe-keeping of the movable heritage.

The display and other forms of presentation of the movable heritage in Bosnia and Herzegovina shall be effected under the terms and conditions stipulated by the ministry of the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina responsible for culture.

Supervision of the implementation of the protection measures pertaining to the movable heritage shall be exercised by the ministry of the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina responsible for culture.

 

V

 

Everyone, and in particular the competent authorities of the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina, the Canton, and urban and municipal authorities, shall refrain from any action that might damage the National Monument or jeopardize the preservation thereof.

 

VI

 

The removal of the movable heritage from Bosnia and Herzegovina is prohibited.

By way of exception to the provisions of paragraph 1 of this Clause, the temporary removal from Bosnia and Herzegovina of the movable heritage for the purposes of display or conservation shall be permitted if it is established that conservation works cannot be carried out in Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Permission for temporary removal under the conditions stipulated in the preceding paragraph shall be issued by the Commission to Preserve National Monuments, if it is determined beyond doubt that it will not jeopardize the movable heritage in any way.

In granting permission for the temporary removal of the movable heritage, the Commission shall stipulate all the conditions under which the removal from Bosnia and Herzegovina may take place, the date by which the items shall be returned to the country, and the responsibility of individual authorities and institutions for ensuring that these conditions are met, and shall notify the Government of the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina, the relevant security service, the customs authority of Bosnia and Herzegovina, and the general public accordingly.

 

VII

 

The Government of the Federation, the relevant ministry, the heritage protection authority, and the Municipal Authorities in charge of urban planning and land registry affairs, shall be notified of this Decision in order to carry out the measures stipulated in Articles II to VI of this Decision, and the Authorized Municipal Court shall be notified for the purposes of registration in the Land Register.

 

VIII

 

The elucidation and accompanying documentation form an integral part of this Decision, which may be viewed by interested parties on the premises or by accessing the website of the Commission (http://www.aneks8komisija.com.ba)

 

IX

 

Pursuant to Art. V para 4 Annex 8 of the General Framework Agreement for Peace in Bosnia and Herzegovina, decisions of the Commission are final.

 

X

 

This Decision shall enter into force on the date of its adoption and shall be published in the Official Gazette of BiH.

 

This Decision has been adopted by the following members of the Commission: Zeynep Ahunbay, Martin Cherry, Amra Hadžimuhamedović, Dubravko Lovrenović, Ljiljana Ševo and Tina Wik.

 

No:

2009

Sarajevo                                                                                              

 

Chair of the Commission

Amra Hadžimuhamedović

 

E l u c i d a t i o n

 

I – INTRODUCTION

Pursuant to Article 2, paragraph 1 of the Law on the Implementation of the Decisions of the Commission to Preserve National Monuments, established pursuant to Annex 8 of the General Framework Agreement for Peace in Bosnia and Herzegovina, a “National Monument” is an item of public property proclaimed by the Commission to Preserve National Monuments to be a National Monument pursuant to Articles V and VI of Annex 8 of the General Framework Agreement for Peace in Bosnia and Herzegovina and property entered on the Provisional List of National Monuments of Bosnia and Herzegovina (Official Gazette of BiH no. 33/02) until the Commission reaches a final decision on its status, as to which there is no time limit and regardless of whether a petition for the property in question has been submitted or not.

On 10 February 2009, Sejdalija Gušić, director of the Historical Archive, Sarajevo, submitted a proposal/petition to designate the property as a national monument of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Pursuant to the provisions of the law, the Commission proceeded to carry out the procedure for reaching a final decision to designate the Property as a National Monument, pursuant to Article V para. 4 of Annex 8 and Article 35 of the Rules of Procedure of the Commission to Preserve National Monuments.

 

Statement of Significance

The archive holdings and collections (documentary material, collections of manuscripts, books, posters, maps, plans, photographs, reproductions, drawings, postage stamps, seals and stamps, varia, stereotypes) owned and housed in the Historical Archive in Sarajevo are of outstanding historical and artistic value. Despite all the misfortunes that have dogged the institution since it was first founded, the JU (public institution) Historical Archive Sarajevo, its current official title, remains one of Bosnia and Herzegovina's most important archives, and a key resource for the study of the history, culture, economy and fine and applied arts of Bosnia and Herzegovina as a whole and Sarajevo in particular. The material assembled and housed in the Archive is an inexhaustible resource for studying the past as well as a basis for understanding the present. The material ranges in date from the Ottoman period to the present day.

 

II – PRELIMINARY PROCEDURE

In the procedure preceding the adoption of a final decision to proclaim the property a national monument, the following documentation was inspected:

-       Documentation of the Historical Archive, Sarajevo, on the property forming the subject of this Decision,

-       Data on the current condition and use of the property, including a description and photographs,

-       An inspection of the condition of the property,

-       Reference works on the property, as set out in the bibliography forming part of this Decision.

 

The findings based on the review of the above documentation and the condition of the property are as follows:

 

1. Details of the property

Location

The National Monument is housed in the following premises: no. 19 Alipašina St., no. 90 Čadordžina St. (storerooms), and no. 13 Ferhadija St. (storerooms) in Sarajevo, Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Historical information

The tradition of preserving archive material in Sarajevo goes back to mediaeval times, as evidenced by surviving muniments, charters, manuscript books and other documents of historical, cultural, economic, political or other significance and value. Though no independent archive institution was established in Bosnia and Herzegovina during the Ottoman or Austro-Hungarian periods, or even in the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes (later the Kingdom of Yugoslavia), organized efforts were made to preserve archive material and even to study and publish it. As long ago as the 16th century the post of defteri-emin, the official charged with keeping official cadastral records and state archives in general, was established in Sarajevo, as the centre of the Bosnian sanjak. It was not until the mid 19th century, and the reforms in the Ottoman Empire, that improved mechanisms for the management of records were introduced and the conditions were created for the orderly filing of records, which had until then been kept in various storerooms in unsuitable conditions.

The forty years of Austro-Hungarian rule (1878-1918) were marked by greater concern for and more orderly filing of records and archive material. Articled 17 of the First Interim Order on the Operation of Institutions in Bosnia and Herzegovina of 16 February 1879, issued by the Provincial Government and published in the Codex of Laws and Orders for Bosnia and Herzegovina in Vienna in 1880, required diplomas, agreements, contracts and all important records to be kept in a safe place. Under the provisions of Article 47 of the 1883 Municipal Statute for the City of Sarajevo, the minutes of the sessions were to be kept in the municipal archive, which were to be accessible to every member of the City Council. In 1914 the Department of the Government's Commissioner for the capital city, Sarajevo, included an Auxiliary Office with archives and a despatch office.

During the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes (later the Kingdom of Yugoslavia), there was a State Archive and Registry Office Bill which provided for the formation of an archive in Sarajevo, but it came to nothing.

After World War II, recognizing the necessity, significance and importance of an archive institution for the city of Sarajevo, as the centre of political, economic and cultural life as a whole, the Sarajevo City Council proposed that an archive for the city be established, modelled on similar institutions already in existence in Belgrade, Zagreb and Ljublijana. The founding deed specified that this body, logically enough, was to be known as the Archive of the City of Sarajevo. The decision to found the archive, with the reference number I/6491, was adopted by the Sarajevo City Council on 3 May 1948, and entered into force pursuant to its publication in the Official Gazette of the People's Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina no. 20 of 20 May 1948. The Archive was founded as an institution with the mission to collect, organize, safeguard and make available for study archive material relating to the life and development and to the political, cultural and economic past of the city of Sarajevo.

Serious preparations for the official launch of the operations of the Archive had already begun on 7 January 1948 in room 106 of the Sarajevo City Council. The Archive was initially housed in one room, then in two small attic rooms with an area of 40 square metres in the City Hall. At first the working conditions were extremely difficult, because of the lack of both space and qualified personnel. Initially the Archive covered only the City of Sarajevo, but with time it expanded into a regional archive institutions responsible for archives for the wider region. Until 1950 the Archive was engaged mainly in finding, collecting and filing archive material, which was located in a variety of places. At that time, what mattered most was transferring material to the Archive to prevent it from being destroyed and to preserve it for the future. In 1951 a manager was appointed to run the Archive, after which it began operating as an independent institution. For the first time, an organizational structure was established and a permanent workforce was engaged, with a certain number of employees. The quantity of archive material that had already been collected and the task faced of classifying, organizing and processing the material, was out of all proportion with the number of employees.

In late 1952, the Archive was allocated slightly larger premises, though still inadequate for the huge intake of new material. In 1953, therefore, the City Council allocated half the premises of the Museum of the City of Sarajevo, at no. 50 Svetozar Marković street, to the Archive, consisting of about ten rooms of various sizes to use as offices and to house the archive material, a total area of about 250 square metres. However, these premises were unsuitable, providing inadequate protection for the archive material.

In 1966 the Archive acquired premises in the then Faculty of Natural Sciences and Mathematics at no. 112 Marshal Tito St. Even this was inadequate for the Archive's needs, since there was no room for further expansion or to carry out its tasks. The safekeeping and protection of archive material, along with other matters relevant to the operation of the archive in general, were already largely governed by legislation at that time. In 1962 the Assembly of the People's Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina enacted the Archive Law, and in 1965 the law was amended to lay greater emphasis on the requirement of the holders of registry office records to ensure that they were safeguarded and professionally maintained. Meantime, at a session held on 6 February 1964, the Sarajevo County Council issuing a ruling, by agreement with the Sarajevo City Council, on the transfer of rights of the founders of certain cultural institutions (including the Archive) to the Sarajevo City Council, under the terms of which the ruling on the transfer of founders' rights in the fields of education and culture from the jurisdiction of the County Council to that of the municipality ceased to be in force.

The premises in Marshal Tito St were a part solution, but not a permanent one, for the Archive. The safekeeping of the archive material gave rise to particular concern; most of it was housed in the Hanikah building (one of the oldest buildings in the city, which the Archive finally vacated only in December 1990, when the material was transferred to store at Vrbanjuša, now no. 90 Čadordžina St). The problem of where to house the material was not resolved satisfactorily the following year, 1967, when the Archive was allocated unsuitable basement premises in the Borough Council building of Centar Municipality.

From 1972, there were rapid changes to the personnel structure of the Archive, with new, suitably qualified staff joining the institution, where they acquired specialist knowledge through working there as well as following courses and attending seminars, mainly organized by the Archive of Serbia, but also through conferences organized by the Society of Archive Workers of Bosnia and Herzegovina and the Society of Archive Workers of Yugoslavia.

A significant step towards securing better conditions for the operations of the Archive, and in particular its staff, was made in 1973, when the Borough Council of Centar Municipality allocated a building at no. 3 Koturova St to the Archive. Following extensive adaptations, all the Archive's departments were housed there, and part of the archive material was also more satisfactorily accommodated in a handy storeroom for material being classified and processed and storerooms in the basement.

In June 1975 the Archive of the City of Sarajevo was renamed the Historical Archive, Sarajevo.

It was not until 1978, with the backing of the City Council, that a 200 square metre storeroom (also designed as a shelter) at no 13 Vase Miskina St (now Ferhadija St) was provided and adapted to house the material from the basement of the Centar Municipality Council building. Though much was thereby done to provide adequate protection, efforts to secure the technical resources (dusting, protection against damp, disinfection, copying, conservation etc.) remained fruitless. This storeroom-cum-atomic shelter was apt to flood, and on several occasions was so badly flooded that part of the archive material was ruined. Most of the steps taken to prevent flooding were of minor extent, reflecting the lack of funds, and the premises are still not adequately protected.

In mid 1986 the City Committee for Education, Culture and Science proclaimed the Archive a Working Organization of Special Social Interest.

During the 1992-1995 war, the Archive managed to preserve all its archive holdings, thanks above all to its staff. In May 1992 the Archive building was hit by a shell. The Archive kept working throughout the war, during which it took over the archive material from 34 registry offices.

By decision of the Assembly of Sarajevo Canton of 24 July 1997, the Canton assumed the founders' rights of the Historical Archive of Sarajevo, which has been officially known since 14 January as the JU [Public Institution] Historical Archive Sarajevo.

After the war, in 1999, the Archive's offices were moved to new and much smaller premises at no. 19 Alipašina St., where they are still located, and which do not meet the institution's real needs. Quite apart from the fact that the office space is small and not fit for purpose, the archive material is housed in three separate locations, which makes it much more difficult for the institution to operate normally and efficiently.     

The Archive is currently organized into the following departments:

1. Department of general legal affairs and the protection of material outside the archive:

1.1. Office of general legal affairs;

1.2. Office for expert supervision and protection of archive and registry material in registry offices;

2. Department for the accommodation, use and technical protection of archive material and book holdings (which includes the special library of the Historical Archive of Sarajevo);

3. Department for classifying and processing archive material;

4. Department for scientific research, publications, cultural, educational and publicity affairs.

The Archive's operations are governed by the current law (Law on Archive Operations of Sarajevo Canton: Official Gazette of Sarajevo Canton no. 2/2000, amendments to the Law in no. 3/05).

While the Archive operated under the name Archive of the City of Sarajevo, it oversaw the territory of the City of Sarajevo, followed by the County of Sarajevo and the wider environs. For a while it also covered Central Bosnia, with the districts of Zenica and Travnik. In 1972 the Archive in Travnik, covering the Zenica and Travnik region, began operating once again, and from then on the Sarajevo Archive oversaw the 26 municipalities of the Sarajevo region. In 1984 the Foča Municipal Archive began operations, and the archive material for that area was transferred there from the Historical Archive of Sarajevo, together with all the necessary equipment (boxes, metal shelving etc.), along with oversight of the total of 382 registry offices in the six municipalities of the Upper Drina region, in line with the information determined at that time.

Until 1992 the Historical Archive of Sarajevo was responsible for the ten municipalities of the City of Sarajevo and the ten municipalities of the extra-urban area. The Archive now covers the area of Sarajevo Canton, in which 1,753 registry offices are recorded.

Despite all the misfortunes that have dogged it since its foundation, the JU Historical Archive Sarajevo, as this distinguished institution is now known, has remained one of the central archive institutions, a vital resource for the study of our history, culture, economy, architecture and so on. The material collected and housed in the Archive's storerooms is an inexhaustible source for the study of the past, as well as the basis for understanding the present. The Archive's contribution is also to be seen in the many publications based on the information it houses, and in its own publications. It has held many exhibitions based on its wealth of irreplaceable archive material; these are an important facet of its cultural and educational activities. Finally, it has held various special events (jubilees, commemorations of events, dates and people, and so on).

 

THE HISTORICAL ARCHIVE OF SARAJEVO'S SPECIAL LIBRARY

At the very outset, the Historical Archive of Sarajevo set up its own library, by taking over part of the former municipal library.

In the 1970s, the Archive's library had about 20,000 titles of books, periodicals and newspapers. This enviable collection of professionally selected titles was assembled by gift, purchase in antiquarian and other bookshops, purchase from private individuals, and subscriptions to newspapers and journals. The library holdings were also enriched by the Archive's treatment as an institution that received obligatory copies.

Following a review of the library holdings, greater care was taken over the selection of material for the library, concentrating on the acquisition of works dealing primarily with archive and related disciplines, history, the ancillary historical sciences, law and philosophy. The acquisition of manuals, encyclopaedias and lexicons also continued with a view to enriching the library. The library of the Historical Archive of Sarajevo thus evolved into a specialist library equal to those of academic research institutions.

A detailed inspection of the operations of the library reveals that the accessions records, card index and arrangement of the books on the stacks have been carried out with considerable skill. Thematic groups have been set up: newspapers and periodicals from Bosnia and Herzegovina, particularly those from Sarajevo; works from our national and cultural history; reports from cultural and educational societies, schools and commercial institutions; the laws and edicts of Bosnia and Herzegovina, particularly those relating to the City of Sarajevo; and numerous encyclopaedias, lexicons and other reference works.

The library holdings in the Archive's library are now classified under the UDC system into ten groups (generalities, philosophy, religion, politics, literature, natural sciences, medicine, the arts, language and linguistics, history). Subgroups have also been set up, within which the various titles are shelved in alphabetical order. Periodicals and rare books form a separate entity.

Plans are in hand to carry out in the near future a complete review and purge of the library holdings, to be conducted using special library software. The extent, importance and condition of the material in the library of the Historical Archive of Sarajevo also mean that measures to provide technical protection are required as a matter of urgency, both on account of its unsuitable premises and to provide a restoration and conservation workshop, book-binding facility and microfilm laboratory.

Books of particular importance in the library's holdings include rare books on Bosnia, in Latin or Gothic script, in the Latin, Germany, Italian and the languages of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina(1), dating from the 16th to the 19th century and printed in Rome, Venice, Vienna and Zagreb, as well as books produced in the Vilayet Press from 1867 to 1870. The library also includes newspapers issued in Sarajevo during the Austro-Hungarian period.

 

2. Description of the property

The archive material of the Historical Archive in Sarajevo is systematized into nine groups:

1. Collections and holdings in oriental languages

2. The administration

3. The judiciary

4. Education, science and culture

5. Health-care and social policy

6. The economy

7. Socio-political organizations

8. Family and personal holdings

9. Collections

 

COLLECTIONS AND HOLDINGS IN ORIENTAL LANGUAGES

The oldest archive material in the Archive dates from the Ottoman period. The Oriental Collection(2) contains more than 14,000 archive units, in manuscript and printed, in Turkish, Arabic and Persian, as well as in Bosnian written in the Arabic script. The material consists of documents, defters (tax census records), sidžils (court protocols [Tur. sicil]), manuscript and printed books, salnamas (almanachs [Pers. salname]), takvims (calendars [Ar. taqwim]), newspapers, periodicals, maps and so on. Of particular interest is a later transcript, dating from 1754 (1167 AH) of al-Wasīyatu Abu Hanifa (Will of Abu Hanifa, who died in 767 CE, or 150 AH). The oldest original document is an emer-nama [Tur. emir, from Ar. amr, + Pers. nama], an order or edict, issued by Gazi Husrev-bey, governor of Bosnia and the man to whom, more than any other, Sarajevo owes its urban development. The edict, which was issued in 1532, grants freedom of religion to all Sarajevo’s residents.

Of particular interest among the defters are five for the Sarajevo leather-workers’ guild dating from 1726, 1750, 1777, 1789 and 1823. A rare printed book in the collection is the Kitab-al Muhassas, a 17-volume Arabic dictionary compiled by Abu-l Hassan b. Ismail (d. 1065 CE/458 AH) in Spain and printed in Istanbul from 1898 to 1902. This dictionary is one of the most valuable works of old Arabic philology. A significant number of the more than 1,000 oriental manuscripts are masterpieces of oriental calligraphy and the art of ornamentation. In both quality and quantity of material, this collection and that of the Gazi Husrev-bey library are among the most important collections of oriental archive material in Europe.

Collections

1. Acta Turcica (Call no. OZ; ZAT-001)

The documents in this Collection come from various local, provincial and central Ottoman government authorities and from private individuals, and pertain largely to Sarajevo and its environs and the interior of Bosnia and Herzegovina. They are of considerable value for the study of the history of Sarajevo and its environs. The oldest documents relating to Sarajevo are transcripts of the vakufnamas [Ar. waqf, Pers. nama] or deeds of pious endowment of three of Bosnian's governors, Isa-bey, dating from 1461, Ajas-bey (1477) and Gazi Husrev-bey (1531), together with the latter's emernama on freedom of religion for all in Sarajevo, dating from 1532.

The documents are of various kinds, consisting of firmans (edicts issued by the sultan [Tur./Pers. ferman]), berats (imperial decrees or charters [Ar. barat]), bujuruldijas (edicts issued by a vizier [Tur. buyruldu]), hudžets (judicial rulings [Tur. hüccet, from Ar. hujja]), ilams (court rulings [Tur. ilam, from Ar. i'lam]), murasalas (court summons [Tur. mürasele, from Ar. murasala]), čifluk(3), lease and sale contracts, tax records, land register records, building permits and other documents, private, business and official correspondence, various certificates, attestations and receipts, accounts, inventories etc.

These documents provide an insight into the development and way of life in Sarajevo, its economic and political circumstances, proprietary and landholding rights, cultural and religious life, customs, etc.

The collection was formed by gift and by purchase from various institutions and private individuals.

Material: of various provenance; time frame: 1461-1914; 9 archive boxes; classified, accessible; languages: language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Turkish; scripts: Arabic, Latin; analytical inventory.

2. Collection of vakufnamas (Call no. OZ; ZVKN-002)

Vakufnamas, deeds of pious endowment, provide exceptionally valuable information relating to economic and cultural history, urban development and legal relations.

The collection consists mainly of 19th century transcripts of vakufnamas relating to Sarajevo and its environs, and also includes translations of various vakufnamas dating from the 16th to the 19th century.

The collection was purchased from Alija Bejtić in 1963.

Material: of various provenance; time frame: 1555-1857; 1 box: 1; classified, accessible; languages: Turkish, language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina; script: Arabic, Latin; summary inventory.

3. Collection of vasijetnamas (Call no. OZ; ZVSN-003)

Vasijetnamas [Ar. wasiya, Pers. nama], wills or testaments, mainly relating to Sarajevo families. Almost all were transcribed or written by Čučak, a distinguished Sarajevo calligrapher, and are thus of value.

The collection was acquired by the Archive in 1955 by purchase from Ziba Čučak of Sarajevo.

Material: of various provenance; time frame: 1699-1908; 1 box; classified, accessible; languages: Turkish; script: Arabic; summary inventory.

4. Collection of defters (Call no. OZ; T-004)

The term “defter” covers a range of documents: a notebook, a protocol, business accounts or records of debits and credits, craft-related documents, spahi and čifluk relations, court records etc.

The most common defters in the Collection are merchants', spahis' and artisans' documents. The most extensive merchants' defters are those of the Sarajevo merchant companies of Kumašin and Užičanin-Kreševljaković, while the spahis' defters include extensive records from the Fadilpašić, Sijerčić, Softić and other families. The Collection also includes defters of some of Sarajevo's vakufs (those of Gazi Husrev-bey, Isa-bey, Mehmed-bey and others), a defter of detainees and debtors of the Sarajevo kadiluk [Tur. kadılık, area under the jurisdiction of a kadı, Ar. qadi] dating from 1843/44, and a reproduction of the cadastral defter of the Bosnian sanjak [Tur. sancak] dating from 1468/69. Of particular value are five defters of the Sarajevo leather-workers' guild, for the period 1726 to 1823.

The Collection also includes six sidžils or court protocols: the sidžil of the Timişuara kadiluk for 1651 to 1653, three sidžils of the Visoko shari'a court dating from 1622, 1839 and 1868, and two sidžils (fragments only) of the Livno kadiluk for 1871 and 1872-74. In addition to documents of a regional nature, the sidžils also include transcripts of firmans and berats issued by the sultan and bujuruldijas issued by viziers.

The Collection was formed, and acquired by the Archive, over a lengthy period, by gifts to the Archive and purchase from various institutions or private individuals.

Material: of various provenance; time frame: 1468-1920; 30 boxes; classified, accessible; languages: Turkish, language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina; script: Arabic, Latin; analytical inventory.

5. Collection of manuscripts (Call no. OZ; R-005)

The collection of manuscript books in oriental languages (Arabic, Turkish and Persian), consists of 802 codices with 1,305 manuscript works, original or in transcript. They deal with a range of subjects, mainly in the following disciplines: the philology of oriental languages (grammar, syntax, orthography, lexicography), philosophy (epistemology, logic, didactics, metaphysics), theology, history, geography, the Qur'an and Qur'an sciences (tafsir, tajwid, qira'a, hadith), mathematics and the natural sciences, medicine, state and society, belles lettres (poetry and prose) and Islamic law.

The Collection also includes transcripts of some of the earliest Arabic, Turkish, Persian and Bosnian writers, including about fifty m/s in Bosnian in the Arabic script. Among major authors of Bosnia and Herzegovina who wrote in oriental languages represented in the Collection are Hasan Kafi Pruščak, Hasan Kaimija, Mula Mustafa Firakija, Muhamed Nerkesi and Hevai Muhamed Uskufi.

A significant number of the manuscripts are masterpieces of oriental calligraphy and the art of ornamentation; in some, the front pages and titles are of particular aesthetic value. They include about forty transcripts of the Qur'an, the oldest of which is a transcript dating from 1599.

The Collection was formed over a lengthy period, and acquired to the Archive, by gifts to the Archive and purchase from various institutions or private individuals.

Material: of various provenance; time frame: 16th-20th century; 105 boxes; classified, accessible; languages: Arabic, Turkish, Persian, language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina; script: Arabic, Latin; catalogue-style inventory.

6. Collection of manuscripts and books of Mehmed Teufik Okić (Call no. OZ; MTO-006)

Hafiz Mehmed Teufik Okić (d. 1932 in Sarajevo) was a high-ranking official of the Islamic Community of Bosnia and Herzegovina during the Austro-Hungarian period and the Kingdom of Yugoslavia. He taught at and was principal of the Osman-kapetan medresa in Gračanica (1901-1910), a member of the Ulema-medžlis [Ar. 'ulama + majlis] and deputy reis-ul-ulema [Ar. ra'is + al 'ulama], and acting reis-ul-ulema from 1912 to 1914. He was also engaged in academic and publishing activities, concentrating in particular on the study of the literary works of local authors(4) and the history of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

The manuscript section of the Collection consists of 168 codices constituting 240 works, and is of considerable academic and cultural value. The Collection also has 555 printed books in Arabic (350), Turkish (194), Persian (11) and Bosnian (2). It covers a wide range of disciplines, and includes works by Turkish and Arab historians, among them Cevdet-paşa Naim, Ibn Khaldun and Evliya Çelebi. The printed works also include many written or commented on by authors from Bosnia and Herzegovina, and a number of salnamas printed in the Vilayet Press in Sarajevo.

The Collection was acquired by the Archive by purchase from Muhamed Okić.

Material: of various provenance, books and manuscripts; time frame: 1495-1932; 23 boxes, 555 books; classified, accessible; languages: Arabic, Turkish, Persian, language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina; script: Arabic, Latin; analytical inventory.

7. Collection of documents of Prof. Hamdija Kreševljaković (Call no. OZ; ZHK-007)

Hamdija Kreševljaković (1888-1959) was one of the leading and most prolific historians of Bosnia and Herzegovina, publishing many books, monographs, articles, reviews etc (over 300 library codices) dealing with the economic, cultural, social and political history of Bosnia and Herzegovina during the Ottoman period.

The Collection is the product of Prof. Hamdija Kreševljaković's long years of academic research, and was assembled from various sources. The documents mainly relate to Sarajevo specifically or to Bosnia and Herzegovina as a whole, and cover almost every kind of document issued by the Ottoman administration (firmans, berats, bujuruldijas etc.).

Part of the Collection was acquired by the Archive in 1956 by purchase from Hamdija Kreševljaković himself, and later, from 1960 to 1962, by purchase from Razija Kreševljaković.

Material: of various provenance; time frame: 1531-1913; 5 boxes; classified, accessible; languages: Turkish, language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina; script: Arabic, Latin; analytical inventory.

8. Collection of photocopies of Ottoman-period documents from the Dubrovnik Archive (Call no. OZ; FDA-008)

The Collection consists of 252 photocopies of various documents of importance for the study of the history of Sarajevo from the Dubrovnik Archive, covering the period from the 16th to the 18th century.

Acquired by the Archive in 1957 by purchase from Hazim Šabanović.

Material: of various provenance; time frame: 16th-18th century; 1 box; partly classified, accessible; languages: Turkish; script: Arabic; summary inventory.

9. Collection of printed books in oriental languages (Call no. OZ; ZŠK-009)

Ever since the Archive was founded, it has been acquiring books in oriental languages (Arabic, Turkish and Persian) and those in Bosnian written in the Arabic script. The books were acquired both for use by the Archive's qualified staff and other interested parties and in order to assemble in one place as many rare publications and editions as possible in the given circumstances. The Collection is still being added to, and has become in effect a specialist library of restricted use, its services used mainly by cultural workers, academic researchers, students and schoolchildren.

The Collection consists of 1,630 library codices, inventoried and catalogued under the UDC system.

It consists mainly of books dealing with the philology of oriental languages, history, geography, literature, law and philosophy. A significant number of the books are by scholars and writers from Bosnia and Herzegovina writing in oriental languages or specializing in alhamijado literature(5). Part of the Collection also consists of periodicals – salnamas (almanachs), takvims and periodicals published in Bosnia and Herzegovina following the introduction of the printing press. The books are acquired mainly by purchase, gift or exchange with other archives, museums and libraries in Bosnia and Herzegovina and abroad.

Holdings

10. The Hajji Sinan tekke (Call no. OZ; HST-010)

The Silahdar Mustafa-pasha tekke in Sarajevo, better known as the Hajji Sinan tekke, was founded in Sarajevo in the mid 17th century. The dervishes of this tekke belonged to the Qadiriyya Sufi tariqa [order]. The first known shaikh of the Hajji Sinan tekke was Hasan Kaimi, a writer and poet, who was exiled from Sarajevo in 1682 for speaking out against Sarajevo merchants for speculating. He died in 1692/93 in Zvornik, where he was buried near the Zvornik fort. Over the centuries the tekke has been closed down or barred from operating on several occasions, for various reasons. In 1890 the Provincial Government for Bosnia and Herzegovina designated the architectural ensemble of the Hajji Sinan tekke as a protected monument.(6) The tekke building is a cultural monument under state protection [a national monument]. The material in this holding is of outstanding importance for the study of the history of Sarajevo and of Sufi orders and tekkes. The Hajji Sinan tekke holding includes documents, manuscripts and printed books acquired by the tekke over the centuries.

The holding was acquired by the Archive in 1959 from Munira Misirlić.

Material: incomplete; time frame: 1592-1945; 31 boxes; classified, accessible; languages: Turkish, Arabic, Persian, language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina; script: Arabic, Latin; analytical inventory.

11. Skender-pasha vakuf – Sarajevo (Call no. OZ; SPV-011)

After his appointment as vizier in Bosnia in 1466/67, Skender-bey began building a Naqshbandiyya hanikah [Ar/Pers. khanaqah] near Gazi Isa-bey’s edifices, with a sarai [court] opposite for himself. He also build a large caravansarai nearby, with eleven shops alongside it, including a barber-surgeon’s, an ironmonger’s, a grocer’s and a baker’s, the profits from which he endowed for the maintenance of the hanikah. The archive material relates to this vakuf and dates from the 19th and 20th centuries, as well as to other Sarajevo vakufs of which the mutevelija [vakuf manager] was Hašimaga Dernišlija, succeeded by his heirs.

The holding was acquired by the Archive in 1962 by purchase from Almasa Imamović.

Material: incomplete; time frame: 1861-1930; 2 boxes; classified, accessible; languages: Turkish, language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina; script: Arabic, Latin; analytical inventory.

Family holdings

12. Bakarević (Call no. OZ; PB-012)

The Bakarević family is one of Sarajevo's most distinguished families, known for trading in čoha [broadcloth], with branches throughout Bosnia and Herzegovina. They also owned čifluks around Sarajevo. There is still a street named Bakarevića St after them, below Bistrik.

The holding was acquired by the Archive in 1960 by purchase from Tarik Fočo.

Material: incomplete; time frame: 1805-1910; 5 boxes; classified, accessible; languages: Turkish, language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina; script: Latin, Arabic; analytical inventory.

13. Džebo (Call no. OZ; PDžB-013)

Another distinguished Sarajevo family. The holding was acquired by the Archive in 1953 by purchase from Sejfa Džebo.

Material: incomplete; time frame: 1879-1987; 1 box; classified, accessible; languages: Turkish, language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina; script: Latin, Arabic; analytical inventory.

14. Džinić (Call no. OZ; PDžN-014)

A well-known Sarajevo family. The Džinić family holding was acquired by the Archive in two stages, first in 1955, when part was purchase from Salih Hasečić, and then in 1956, when the rest was purchased from Aiša Džinić.

Material: incomplete; time frame: 1767-1912; 1 box; classified, accessible; languages: Turkish, language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina; script: Arabic, Latin; analytical inventory.

15. Fadilpašić (Call no. OZ; PFP-015)

The founder of this family was Fadil effendi Šerifović, who was promoted to miri-liva (divisional general) of the Klis and Zvornik alaj (regiment), and who was known from then on as Fadil pasha. The Fadilpašić family were a distinguished and influential family at that time, who owned a large konak [residence] in Bistrik, as well as extensive estates throughout Bosnia and Herzegovina, from which they enjoyed a significant income. In 1878, Mustaj-bey Fadilpašić was the first Lord Mayor of Sarajevo following the entry of the Austro-Hungarian occupying forces.

The archive material was acquired by the Archive by purchase from Hasan Hadžijahić in 1953 and Fahrija Fadilpašić in 1958 and 1959.

Material: incomplete; time frame: 1742-1912; 7 boxes; classified, accessible; languages: Turkish, language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina; script: Arabic, Latin; analytical inventory.

16. Glođo-Svrzo (Call no. OZ; PGZ-016)

On three occasions between 1954 and 1957 the Archive purchased archive material from the heirs of the Svrzo family, relating to the life and work of the Svrzo and Glođo families, distinguished aga, bey and ulema families of Sarajevo. In the mid 19th century the two families effectively became one by marriage. They were extremely active in the social and political life of Sarajevo, particularly just before and following the Austro-Hungarian occupation, and were known as keen champions and activists of the movement for the cultural, religious and educational autonomy of the Bosniacs.

Material: incomplete; time frame: 1705-1940; 3 boxes; classified, accessible; languages: Turkish, language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina; script: Arabic, Latin; analytical inventory.

17. Hadžišabanović (Call no. OZ; PHŠ-017)

A distinguished Sarajevo family playing an important part in the social and cultural development of the city from the mid 18th century on.

The Archive acquired the material in 1954 by purchase from Zehra Hadžišabanović.

Material: incomplete; time frame: 1715-1890; 5 boxes; classified, accessible; languages: Turkish, language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina; script: Arabic, Latin; analytical inventory.

18. Handžić (Call no. OZ; PHNDž-018)

The Archive acquired the material in 1954 by purchase from Džemal Handžić.

Material: incomplete; time frame: 1745-1872; 1 archive box; classified, accessible; languages: Turkish, language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina; script: Arabic, Latin; analytical inventory.

19. Kabadaja (Call no. OZ; PKB-019)

The Kabadaja family, an aga family, had an iron-mining business in Vareš and also traded in finished wares with merchants from Dubrovnik.

The Archive acquired the material in 1962 by purchase from Šemsudin Korić.

Material: incomplete; time frame: 1702-1915; 1 archive box; classified, accessible; languages: Turkish, language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina; script: Arabic, Latin; analytical inventory.

20. Krečo (Call no. OZ; PKČ-020)

A distinguished Sarajevo merchant family. The material was acquired by the Archive in 1965 by purchase from Nezir Krečo.

Material: incomplete; time frame: 1788-1921; 1 archive box; classified, accessible; languages: Turkish, language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina; script: Arabic, Latin; analytical inventory.

21. Kumašin (Call no. OZ; PKŠ-021)

The holding of the Kumašin family, a distinguished Sarajevo merchant family, consists of documents of various kinds, including those relating to proprietary matters, government and business documents, wills, business records and correspondence.

The Archive acquired the material in 1963 by purchase from Muhamed Kumašin.

Material: incomplete; time frame: 1610-1920; 10 boxes; classified, accessible; languages: Turkish, language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina; script: Arabic, Latin; analytical inventory.

22. Mravović (Call no. OZ; PMR-022)

The distinguished Mravović family of Sarajevo was in the leather-goods business and trade. The Archive acquired the material in 1963 by purchase from Nazif Ljuco.

Material: incomplete; time frame: 1752-1919; 1 archive box; classified, accessible; languages: Turkish, language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina; script: Arabic, Latin; analytical inventory.

23. Pertev (Call no. OZ; PPER-23)

The Archive acquired the material in 1962 by purchase from Osman Pertev.

Material: incomplete; time frame: 1831-1888; 1 archive box; classified, accessible; languages: Turkish; script: Arabic, analytical inventory.

24. Saračević (Call no. OZ; PSAR-024)

The Archive acquired the material between 1954 and 1957 by purchase from Tajb Saračević.

Material: incomplete; time frame: 1716-1917; 1 archive box; classified, accessible; languages: Turkish, language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina; script: Arabic, Latin; analytical inventory.

25. Užičanin-Kreševljaković (Call no. OZ; PUK-025)

The Archive acquired the archival and manuscript material from the Užičanin-Kreševljaković family, a merchant family, in 1966 by purchase from Razija Kreševljaković and in 1968 by purchase from Timur Numić. It consists of trade defters and documentation and various correspondence.

Material: incomplete; time frame: 18th-20th century; 30 boxes; partly classified, accessible; languages: Turkish, German, language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina; script: Arabic, Latin; summary inventory.

26. Zildžić (Call no. OZ; PZIL-026)

The Archive acquired the archival material relating to the activities of the Zildžić family in 1963 by purchase from Šaćir Zildžo.

Material: incomplete; time frame: 1595-1890; 3 boxes; classified, accessible; languages: Turkish, language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina; script: Arabic, Latin; analytical inventory.

 

STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT

27. Government Commissioner for the Provincial Capital, Sarajevo / Regierungskommissär für die Landeshauptstadt Sarajevo (Call no. VP-3 / R.C.)

The Government Commissioner for the provincial capital, Sarajevo (the Government Commission) was responsible for the administration of law and order and for overseeing the work of City Hall and the City Council of Sarajevo, where he was the official representative of the country's highest authority. The appointment of the Government Commissioner meant that Sarajevo City Hall took over the agenda of the political powers of first instance, which also ran the city guard; from 1907 he was also responsible for the education supervisor for the city of Sarajevo.

The Government Commissioner was directly accountable to the Provincial Government, and acted as intermediary between the City Council and the highest authority. After the Police Authority was abolished in 1884, the Government Commissioner's office also took over the running of the police. The Commissioner could dissolve sessions of the City Council, and had the right to oversee City Hall in the exercise of administrative affairs, the management of municipal property and the verification of the municipal accounts. He examined, certified and signed all the minutes of the sessions of the City Council, and had the power to suspend the execution of any ruling he considered to be against the public interest. He thus had very wide rights and powers. The establishment of a Police Authority for Bosnia and Herzegovina in 1917 significantly reduced the jurisdiction of the Government Commissioner, and the post was abolished in 1918.

Books:

1. Registers: 1904-1912, 13 volumes;

2. Protocols:1903-1915, 22 volumes;

3. Two protocols (1902 and 1918) Penal/criminal police records with sequential numbers and registration records.

Records: time span from 1890-1916, approx. 840 boxes.

This holding is partly preserved and has been classified on the registry principle. The archive material has been classified by number chronologically, and entire sections of 1,000 numbers have been found to be missing in certain fascicles, while in most cases, half the records are missing within surviving sections. The archive documentation for 1890-1900 is fragmentary, but from 1901 to 1915 it is complete; the documentation for 1916 consists only of presidial records (483 records). The material is relatively accessible.

The languages of the Austro-Hungarian authorities were German and the local language, with some Hungarian, written in Gothic, Latin and Cyrillic.

28. City Hall Sarajevo (Call no. GP-1)

The holding of City Hall Sarajevo consists of highly important archive material in the possession of the Historical Archive of Sarajevo. It covers complete documentation for the Sarajevo city authorities for three politico-historical periods: the Austro-Hungarian occupation (1878-1918), the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes, later the Kingdom of Yugoslavia (1918-1941) and the Independent State of Croatia (1941-1945).

City Hall was an executive authority, operating under the control of the City Council and Provincial Government. Under the terms of the law and order regulations, it was responsible for municipal services and public order in the city of Sarajevo: asphalting and cleaning the streets, street lighting, mains drainage, cleaning caravanserais, repairs to bridges and sewers, the fire service and flood protection. It was also responsible for assisting the administration in the collection of taxes, and for helping the local police to maintain law and order and the safety of persons and property.

City Hall also dealt with certain issues concerning the security and management of municipal property, education, and other services such as health care, provision for the poor, housing, and the procurement and accommodation of vehicles, horses and food supplies for military and civilian needs.

This holding was acquired from the Sarajevo City Council in a number of stages, in 1948, 1949, 1952 and 1953. In addition to documentation pertaining solely to City Hall, some documentation has been preserved from various city offices: the City Food Supplies, Income Tax Office and City Physician's Office. Since this large holding has been in the possession of the Historical Archive of Sarajevo, it has been completed and classified by provenance (by registry protocol). The records are classified by content, and the documents are filed in chronological order within each.

A summary inventory of the archive units has been made for the Austro-Hungarian period, with an analytical inventory for the years 1879, 1888 and 1890-1894. As regards the inter-war period (to 1940), an analytical inventory has been drawn up of City Hall for 1919-1929. Work on the City Hall archive material is on-going.

The holding consists of about 2,645 City Hall boxes, with another 17 volumes of various City Hall departments, 86 boxes from the Income Tax Office, 28 boxes from the City Physician's Office, seven boxes from the City Food Supplies Office and three boxes from the Buildings Department (of which an analytical inventory has been drawn up).

A part inventory of City Hall records has also been drawn up covering all registry protocols and nominal registers for 1879-1945 (730 volumes). A complete inventory for the other records from the Austro-Hungarian period has been drawn up, and an inventory of the records for 1919-1945 is currently being drawn up.

The Historical Archive Sarajevo also possesses a number of volumes of minutes of sessions of the City Council (one for the years 1878 and 1879, one [each?] for 1885, 1886 and 1887, one for 1888-1893, one for 1908-1910, one for 1914, one fascicle of the minutes of ordinary and extraordinary sessions for 1879 and 1881, and 19 for the period 1919-1940.

29. Statistics Office of the Provincial Government for Bosnia and Herzegovina 1910 Population Census for Bosnia and HerzegovinaSarajevo (Call no. SUGO-2)

The fourth population census was conducted in 1910 under the auspices of the Statistics Office of the Provincial Government for Bosnia and Herzegovina. Before conducting the census, every house was numbered, and the topography of the various places was identified. The census began on 10 October 1910 pursuant to a Government order of 16 September 1909. The census covered not only the human population but also the most important livestock. For the cities of Sarajevo, Banja Luka, Mostar, Bihać, Travnik and Tuzla, the census also included details of the circumstances of the population. The census was run by the district offices with the assistance of the municipal offices. In the capital, Sarajevo, the census was entrusted to the Government Commissioner.

The material is complete, but has not been classified and is not currently accessible (approx. 130 portfolios).

30. Office of National Economic Renewal – Sarajevo branch (Call no. DRG-6)

The Office of National Renewal, established to a legal order of 24 June 1941, and the Office of National Economic Renewal, established on 1 July 1941, were merged into the Office of National Development Renewal on 15 September 1941.

With the establishment of the government authorities of the Independent State of Croatia [NDH] in Bosnia and Herzegovina in 1941, Jews were required to declare all their property, movable and immovable, on forms 1 and 2, giving personal and family details, a detailed list of their movable and immovable property, and any savings, shareholdings etc.

The state appointed trustees to manage confiscated property, mainly belonging to Jews and Serbs; the number of trustees varied from one to five, depending on the value and extent of the property. At first, trustees were appointed to all companies owned by Jews and Serbs.

Separate regulations applied to Jews and Roma, to whom the Law Decree on Racial Affiliation applied. The Roma were of no interest to the NDH, since they had no property of any kind, movable or immovable.

A record was made of confiscated movable property, savings etc., and in certain circumstances modest sums were paid to the owners to keep body and soul together.

A Law Decree of 30 December 1941 abolished the Office of National Renewal, which was wound up on 23 February 1942, when a report on its operations and liquidation was drawn up.       

The archive material of this holding was acquired by the Archive from the City National Real Property Authority in 1949. The holding is in six boxes, and an analytical inventory has been drawn up. It has also been microfilmed and is accessible to researchers. The holding is in the Croatian language, written in Latin script.

31. City Hall Sarajevo – Office for the Management of Jewish Real Property (Call no. UŽN-13)

An Office for the Management of Jewish Real Property was established within the ambit of City Hall on 28 August 1941. The Office of National Renewal had ordered City Hall to set up this office, which dealt mainly with residential properties but also maintained records of Jewish-owned businesses and companies, which were run by the Union of Progressive Cooperatives, which leased them out (without inventories: the inventories of businesses and homes were handled by the City Hall Movable Property Office), and later also sold these business and companies.

When the Office of National Renewal was abolished, followed by the abolition of the Office for the Management of Jewish Real Property, their affairs were taken over by the Treasury Authority's Nationalized Property Office Sarajevo on 1 November 1942.

The archive material of this holding was acquired by the Archive from the City's State Property Authority in 1949. The holding is in 15 boxes, and an analytical inventory has been drawn up. It has also been microfilmed and is accessible to researchers. The holding is in the Croatian language, written in Latin script.

32. Treasury Authority in Sarajevo – Nationalized Property Office (Call no. RU-11)

This office maintained records of and managed the immovable property of those who had been forced to abandon it or had been taken to concentration camp. The archive material was acquired in 1949 from the City's State Property Authority. It ranges in date from 1942 to 1945. The holding (in more than 100 boxes) is currently being processed and classified, and work is also in hand on an analytical inventory and microfilming.

33. Council of the City of Sarajevo or City Council (Call no. GNO-106)

Both as a city and as a political and territorial unit, Sarajevo became a separate entity in 1945. The first official authorities were formed on 19 April 1945, as the City People's Liberation Council. At first the Council had jurisdiction over nine urban quarters, but in May 1945 the city was subdivided into boroughs. This People's Liberation Committee acted until 21 July 1945, when a new Council of the City of Sarajevo was appointed. Sarajevo became a separate entity, subdivided into four boroughs, an arrangement that was retained until 1949 when Sarajevo was reorganized into five rather than four boroughs.

In 1952 the borough councils of the city of Sarajevo were replaced by municipalities. The City Council was replaced by the Sarajevo City County pursuant to the adoption of a general law on the organization of municipalities and counties in June 1955.

The Rulebook on the Uniform Administrative Affairs of Local Councils of 26 November 1945 regulated the management of official documents, as a result of which the archive material has largely been preserved intact.

The Archive acquired the archive material in two stages, from the Sarajevo County Council in 1961 and from the Assembly of Centar Municipality Sarajevo in 1981.

Material; complete; time frame: 1945-1955 (about 840 boxes and about 350 volumes); classified and accessible; summary inventories have been drawn up for the various periods.          

Sarajevo Borough Councils

Pursuant to the Republic Law on the Organization of Local Councils of 18 August 1945, Sarajevo became a separate entity, subdivided into four boroughs. These were governed, within the limits of their jurisdiction, by the borough councils, consisting of 45 members elected by the citizens. The borough councils were administrative entities dealing with most local affairs and exercising certain governance functions in their respective boroughs.

Under the terms of a separate Law on the Administrative Division of the People's Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina of 15 September 1949, Sarajevo was subdivided into five boroughs, with the suburb of Ilidža becoming the fifth. The 1952 General Local Councils Law abolished the borough councils, which were replaced by municipalities. The archive material was acquired from Sarajevo Centar Council in 1968.

34. Sarajevo Borough Council I (Call no. NO / I-284)

Material: complete, relatively classified and accessible; time frame: 1945-1952; 84 boxes; 72 volumes. A summary-analytical inventory has been drawn up.

35. Sarajevo Borough Council II (Call no. NO / II-285)

Material: complete, relatively classified and accessible; time frame: 1945-1952; 86 boxes; 85 volumes. A summary-analytical inventory has been drawn up.             

36. Sarajevo Borough Council III (Call no. NO / III-286)

Material: complete, relatively classified and accessible; time frame: 1945-1952; 68 boxes; 66 volumes. A summary-analytical inventory has been drawn up. 

37. Sarajevo Borough Council IV (Call no. NO / IV-287)

Material: complete, relatively classified and accessible; time frame: 1945-1952; 57 boxes; 86 volumes. A summary-analytical inventory has been drawn up. 

38. Sarajevo County Council (Call no. NOS-511)

No sooner had the country been liberated in 1945 than the Law on the Territorial Division of Federal Bosnia and Herzegovina was adopted. Sarajevo District was divided into twelve counties and Sarajevo City Council. Sarajevo and its extra-urban areas constituted a county, in which the Sarajevo County Council had jurisdiction over the areas around Sarajevo.

Over the next few years it became clear that the powers exercised by the counties were hindering the development of the municipalities, as the basic socio-political unit, and in 1966 the decision was taken to promulgate a constitutional law abolishing the counties. Sarajevo County ceased operating on 30 June 1966, and its affairs were transferred to the jurisdiction of the municipal councils and republic authorities.

The archive of closed cases was taken over by Centar Municipality Sarajevo, where the Sarajevo County Council was based. Taken as a whole, the archive material of Sarajevo County Council is of particular importance for the reconstruction of events and affairs in Sarajevo County, and thus receives separate treatment in the Archive.

The archive material was acquired from Centar Municipality Sarajevo in 1981, and the part of the material relating to expropriations, consisting of 250 fascicles, was acquired, unclassified, in 1995.

Material: complete, relatively classified and accessible; time frame: 1945-1966; 1172 boxes; 385 volumes; 250 fascicles. A summary-analytical inventory has been drawn up

39. Minutes of Sessions of the County Council, City Council, Borough Councils and Municipalities (Call no. ZSSFRO-510)

The archive material was acquired from Centar Municipality Sarajevo in 1891.

Material: complete, relatively classified and accessible; time frame: 1945-1963; 128 volumes. A summary-analytical inventory has been drawn up.

40. Sarajevo City Public Property Authority (Call no. GUN-451)

The Public Property Authorities were established to manage the property of persons who had been forcibly displaced or had fled and that of war criminals until such time as these properties were restored to their owners or third parties pursuant to a court ruling (Law on Procedure relating to Property Involuntarily Abandoned by its Owner – Official Gazette of Democratic Federal Yugoslavia no. 36/45).

Material: complete, relatively classified and accessible; time frame: 1945-1946, 4 boxes. A summary-analytical inventory has been drawn up.

41. City Authority for State Real Property (Call no. GUD-450)

The archive material was acquired from Sarajevo County Council in 1963.

Material: complete, relatively classified and accessible; time frame: 1945-1955, 39 boxes; 17 volumes. A summary inventory has been drawn up.

42. State Real Property Authority (Call no. UDN-249)

The archive material was acquired from Sarajevo County Council in 1963.

Material: complete, relatively classified and accessible; time frame: 1945-1958, 49 boxes; 149 volumes. A summary-analytical inventory has been drawn up.

 

THE JUDICIARY

The Courts in Bosnia and Herzegovina

Austria-Hungary largely retained the existing Ottoman administrative structure, tax system and agrarian relations of the Ottoman period when they occupied Bosnia and Herzegovina.

At first the judiciary fell within the ambit of the administration. Courts matrial were the first to be introduced, followed by civil courts. County offices conducted the business of the county courts, shari'a affairs and the land register. Alongside each county court was a shari'a court to deal with the vakuf, family and inheritance matters of the Muslim population. It was only in 1906 that the judiciary in Bosnia and Herzegovina became independent. The County Offices as County Courts (the phrase used in the records of the county offices when acting in the capacity of the judiciary) and higher instances were transformed into an independent body, along with the Supreme Court. The county offices had both judicial and police powers: the judiciary was independent only as far as the county offices, with which it was associated, so the county office, when acting in its judicial capacity, issued rulings. The county courts also had a Land Register Office, and were the courts of first instance; the district courts were also appellate courts.(7)  

In 1929 the county courts [kotarski sudovi] became county courts [sreski sudovi] as courts of first instance, with the district courts [okružni sudovi] as appellate courts.(8) The Land Register Offices remained associated with the county courts.

After World War II, Bosnia and Herzegovina was organized administratively into district, county, city and borough councils, and this division was echoed by that of the judiciary. The City of Sarajevo and Sarajevo City Hall were not part of Sarajevo County, which consisted of the extra-urban territory; there was thus a County Court for the City of Sarajevo and another for Sarajevo County, as well as a District Court for the City of Sarajevo and another for the County of Sarajevo and the other five districts. The Land Register Offices remained with the county courts.

The shari'a courts were abolished in 1946. In 1955 the administrative and judicial division of Bosnia and Herzegovina was changed. The City Council, covering the city and its municipalities [sometimes referred to as communes], was abolished, as was the County Court for the City of Sarajevo. County Court I was established for the municipalities of Centar, Stari Grad, Pale, Prača and Vogošća, with a Land Register Office, and County Court II for the municipalities of Novo Sarajevo, Ilidža, Hadžići, Srednje and Trnovo. When the county was abolished in 1966, these courts became Municipal Courts I and II in Sarajevo.

The Historical Archive of Sarajevo acquired the material of the County Office as Court, the County Court, the District Court and the Courts Martial from the Archive of Bosnia and Herzegovina in 1969. This part of the material has been classified and has a summary inventory. The material of the institutions acquired by the Historical Archive of Sarajevo from the Archive of Bosnia and Herzegovina in 1988 has not been classified.

The material of the civil courts covers the period 1878 to 1946, and that of the courts martial up to 1918.

43. County Shari'a Court (Call no. KŠS-534)

The archive material was acquired from the Archive of Bosnia and Herzegovina in 1988.

The material, which covers the period 1878 to 1916, is incomplete. There are about 385 bundles and 21 volumes, unclassified and inaccessible. The languages of the holding are the language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Turkish and German, and the scripts used are Latin and arebica [a version of the Perso-Arabic script used to write the Bosnian language].

44. County Shari'a Court Visoko (Call no. SŠSV-535)

The archive material was acquired from the Archive of Bosnia and Herzegovina in 1988.

The material, which covers the period 1878 to 1891, is incomplete. There are 19 volumes, partly classified and accessible. The languages of the holding are the language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina and Turkish, and the scripts used are Latin and arebica.        

45. Military Command Sarajevo/K.u.K.(9) Militär Commando Sarajevo (Call no. VKS-515)

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period 1917 to 1918, and is in 77 boxes. The holding is relatively classified and accessible, with a summary inventory. The languages of the holding are German and the language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina, and the scripts Gothic and Latin.

46. Fortress Command Sarajevo/Festungskommando (Call no. KTS-516)

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period 1914 to 1918, and is in 188 boxes and one fascicle. The holding is relatively classified and accessible, with a summary inventory. The languages of the holding are German and the language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina, and the scripts Gothic and Latin.

47. Court Officer of the Deputy Military Commander/Gerichtsoffizier des Stellvertreters Militärkommandanten (Call no. SOVK-517)

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period 1917 to 1918, and is in 14 boxes. The holding is classified and accessible. The languages of the holding are German and the language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina. A summary inventory has been drawn up.

48. Divisional Court Sarajevo/Divisiongericht in Sarajevo (Call no. DS-518)

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period 1917 to 1918, and is in 81 boxes. The holding is relatively classified and accessible, with a summary inventory. The languages of the holding are German and the language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina, and the scripts Gothic and Latin.

49. Garrison Court Sarajevo / K.u.K. Garnisonsgericht in Sarajevo (Call no. GS-519)

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period 1898 to 1918, and is in 504 boxes. The holding is classified and accessible, with a summary inventory. The languages of the holding are German and the language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

50. Court of the Gendarmerie Corps Commander for BiH/Gericht des Gendarmeriekorpskommandanten für BiH (Call no. SKŽB-520)

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period 1914 to 1917, and is in 5 boxes. The holding is classified and accessible, with a summary inventory. The languages of the holding are German and the language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

51. Military Command Mostar/K.u.K. Militärkommando in Mostar (Call no. VKT-522)

The material, which is incomplete, dates from 1915, and is in one archive box, classified and accessible, with a summary inventory, in German and the language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

52. Military Command Tuzla/K.u.K. Militärkommando in Tuzla (Call no. VKT-522)

The material, which is incomplete, dates from 1916, and is in one archive box, classified and accessible, with a summary inventory, in German and the language of the peoples.

53. Military Command Banja Luka/K.u.K. Militärkommando in Banja Luka (Call no. VKBL-523)

The material, which is incomplete, dates from 1915-1916, and is in 4 boxes, classified and accessible, with a summary inventory, in German and the language of the peoples.

54. Garrison Court Banja Luka/K.u.K. Garnisonsgericht in Banja Luka (Call no. GSBL-524)

The material, which is incomplete, dates from 1905, and is in one archive box, classified and accessible, with a summary inventory, in German and the language of the peoples.

55. Garrison Court Ragusa/K.u.K. Garnisonsgericht in Ragusa (Call no. GSR-525)

The material, which is incomplete, dates from 1883 to 1097, and is in 17 boxes, classified and accessible, with a summary inventory, in German and the language of the peoples.

56. Divisional Court in Vienna/K.u.K. Divisionsgericht in Wien (Call no. DSB-526)

The material, which is incomplete, dates from 1917 to 1918, and is in 2 boxes, classified and accessible, with a summary inventory, in German and the language of the peoples.

57. War Court III of Sarajevo assembly area (Call no. RSZS-527)

The material, which is incomplete, dates from 1943, and is in one archive box, classified and accessible, with a summary inventory.

58. District Court Sarajevo (Call no. OSS-528)

The material, which is incomplete, dates from 1922 to 1941, and is in 36 boxes, partly classified and accessible, with a summary inventory.

59. County Office (as County Court) Sarajevo (Call no. KUS-529)

The material, which is incomplete, dates from 1886 to 1911, and is in 40 boxes and one fascicle, partly classified and accessible, with a summary inventory, in German and the language of the peoples.

60. County Court Sarajevo (Call no. KSS-488)

The material, which is incomplete, dates from 1886 to 1946, and is in 1100 boxes and 60 fascicles, [partly classified and accessible, with a part summary inventory, in German and the language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

61. Land Register Office (of the County/Municipal Court) (Call no. ZKU-530)

The material, which is complete, dates from 1886 to 1985, and is in 287 fascicles (anlags-plans), 1080 bundles and 69 volumes, classified and accessible, with a summary inventory, in German and the language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

62. Title Deeds of cadastral municipalities (Hadžići etc. (Call no. ZPLH-536)

The archive material was acquired from Hadžići Council in 1976.

The material is fragmentary, covering the year 1884-1918, 1941-1945 and 1958-1962, and is in 41 fascicles and 6 volumes, classified and accessible, with a summary inventory.

 

EDUCATION, SCIENCE AND CULTURE

Education

Primary Schools

62. General Primary School in the Institute of the Sisters of Mercy of St Vincent – Sarajevo (Call no. PZMS-225)

The school was founded in 1871 for Catholic children, though pupils of other faiths also attended. It was for girls only until 1918, when classes for boys were also introduced. The school was later renamed the Roman Catholic Primary School in the Institute of St Vincent. It was closed down in 1945. The Archive acquired the material in 1961.

The material is incomplete, covering the period from 1880 to 1945, in one archive box and 268 volumes, classified and accessible, and with an analytical inventory.

63. Muslim Girls' Primary School – Sarajevo (Call no. MŽOŠ-34)

The school, founded in 1896, was attended only by Muslim girls. In 1901 the Provincial Government for Bosnia and Herzegovina opened a continuation course at the school.

The archive material was acquired by the Archive just after its establishment in 1948. The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1896 to 1906, and is in 2 volumes, classified and accessible, with a summary inventory.

64. Israelite-Sephardi Primary SchoolSarajevo (Call no. ISOŠ-31)

The school was founded in 1903, and was attended by Sephardi Jewish children.

The Archive acquired the material in 1969 from the Jovan Jovanović Zmaj primary school in Sarajevo. The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1903 to 1912, and is in six volumes, classified and accessible, with a summary inventory.

65. Public(10) Primary School in the Institute of St AugustineSarajevo (Call no. NOSA-256)

The schools was founded by the Congregation of the Daughters of Divine Love in the 1880s. The language medium was German, and the school was intended for the children of foreigners coming to Bosnia and Herzegovina. Following an order by the National Council for Bosnia and Herzegovina of 1 January 1919, the local language replaced German as the language medium. The school was mixed, but in 1945 was abolished along with the other confessional schools. The archive material was acquired by the Archive in 1961 along with that of the other confessional schools.

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1918 to 1945, and is in 82 boxes, classified and accessible, with an analytical inventory.

66. 1st Girls' Public Primary SchoolSarajevo (Call no. I DNO-391)

The school opened in November 1879, and was for girls only. From 1879 it was known as the First Girls' Public Primary School in Sarajevo. It remained in operation until 1918. The archive material was acquired by the Archive in 1961.

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1881 to 1903, and is in 148 volumes, classified and accessible, with an analytical inventory.

67. Coeducational Public Primary School at the State Railway Station – Sarajevo (Call no. MODK-392)

The archive material was acquired by the Archive in 1968 from the Ivan Goran Kovačić primary school in Hrasno (Sarajevo).

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1901 to 1940, and is in 6 boxes, classified and accessible, with a summary inventory.

68. 8th Public Primary SchoolSarajevo (Call no. VIII. NOŠ-393)

The archive material was acquired by the Archive in 1968 from the Ivan Goran Kovačić primary school in Hrasno (Sarajevo).

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1920 to 1938, and is in 14 boxes, classified and accessible, with a summary inventory.

69. 9th National Public Primary SchoolSarajevo (Call no. XI. DNOŠ-394)

The archive material was acquired by the Archive in 1968 from the Ivan Goran Kovačić primary school in Hrasno (Sarajevo).

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1938 to 1947, and is in 10 volumes and two bundles, classified and accessible, with a summary inventory.

70. 1st Public Primary SchoolSarajevo (Call no. I. NOŠ-259)

There were two primary schools by this name, the first with archive material from 1881 to 1904, and the second from 1912 to 1937, together forming a single archive holding.

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1881 to 1937, and is in 87 volumes, classified and accessible, with an analytical inventory.

71. 2nd Public Primary SchoolSarajevo (Call no. II. NOŠ-260)

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1908 to 1928, and is in 13 volumes, classified and accessible.

72. 2nd Public Girls' Primary School – Sarajevo (Call no. II. SNOŠ-395)

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1895 to 1913, and is in 26 volumes, classified and accessible, with an analytical inventory.

73. 2nd Public Muslim Primary SchoolSarajevo (Call no. II. NMOŠ-396)

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1887 to 1914, and is in 15 volumes, classified and accessible, with a summary inventory.

74. 2nd Public Primary SchoolSarajevo (Call no. II. NOŠ-397)

The archive material relates to the Razija Omanović primary school. It is incomplete for the period 1945 to 1953, and is in 3 boxes, classified and accessible, with a summary inventory.

75. 3rd Public Primary SchoolSarajevo (Call no. III. NOŠ-261)

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1910 to 1940, and is in 19 volumes, classified and accessible.

76. 4th Public Primary SchoolSarajevo (Call no. IV. NOŠ-262)

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1897 to 1936, and is in 37 volumes, classified and accessible.

77. 5th Public Primary SchoolSarajevo (Call no. V. NOŠ-263)

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1911 to 1946, and is in one archive box and 17 volumes, classified and accessible.

78. 6th Public Primary SchoolSarajevo (Call no. VI. NOŠ-264)

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1912 to 1946, and is in 93 volumes, classified and accessible.

79. 7th Public Primary SchoolSarajevo (Call no. VII. NOŠ-265)

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1912 to 1940=6, and is in 18 volumes, classified and accessible.

80. 8th Public Primary SchoolSarajevo (Call no. VIII. NOŠ-266)

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1910 to 1932, and is in 17 volumes, classified and accessible.

81. 9th Public Primary SchoolSarajevo (Call no. IX. NOŠ-267)

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1919 to 1934, and is in 15 volumes, classified and accessible.

82. 11th Public Primary SchoolSarajevo (Call no. XI. NOŠ-398)

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1924 to 1947, and is in one archive box, 30 volumes and two bundles, classified and accessible.

83. 12th Public Primary SchoolSarajevo (Call no. XII. NOŠ-399)

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1924 to 1947, and is in one archive box, 30 volumes and two bundles, classified and accessible.

84. 12th(11) Public Primary SchoolSarajevo (Call no. XIII NOŠ-268)

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1931 to 1939, and is in 7 volumes, classified and accessible.

85. Public Primary School for reservists' children – Sarajevo (Call no. NOŠP-400)

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1917 to 1918, and is in one volume, classified and accessible.

86. 2nd Girls' Public Primary SchoolSarajevo (Call no. II DNOŠ-401)

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1895 to 1914, and is in 30 volumes, classified and accessible.

87. 3rd Girls' Public Primary SchoolSarajevo (Call no. III DNOŠ-402)

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1914 to 1925, and is in 8 volumes, classified and accessible.

88. 2nd Public Coeducational School – Sarajevo (Call no. II PMŠ-403)

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1941 to 1944, and is in one archive box, classified and accessible.

89. 2nd Children's Public School – Sarajevo (Call no. II DNŠ-404)

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1887 to 1913, and is in 16 bundles, classified and accessible, with a summary inventory.

90. 2nd Kraljević Tomislav State Public Primary School - Sarajevo (Call no. II DŠKT-405)

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1932 to 1946, and is in 3 boxes and 43 volumes, classified and accessible.

91. 9th Public Primary School (Work experience for the coeducational teacher training school) – Sarajevo (Call no. IX VŠMU-406)

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1935 to 1936, and is in 2 volumes, classified and accessible.

92. 1st Public Girls' Primary School – Sarajevo (Call no. I NDOŠ-408)

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1897 to 1914, and is in 6 volumes, classified and accessible.

93. 1st Public Boys' Primary School – Sarajevo (Call no. I NDOŠ-407)

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1912 to 1931, and is in 19 volumes, classified and accessible.

94. Joint Education Board for the City of SarajevoSarajevo (Call no. MŠO-68)

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1930 to 1948, and is in 12 volumes, classified and accessible.

95. Education Inspector for the City of SarajevoSarajevo (Call no. ŠNGS-409)

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1931 to 1943, and is in 22 boxes and 10 volumes, classified and accessible, with a summary-analytical inventory.

Civic Schools and Advanced Girls' Schools

96. Business SchoolSarajevo (Call no. TŠ-97)

The school was established in 1886, and was renamed the Vocational Business School in 1908. In 1924 it was known as the State Civic Business Programme Boys' School, and from the 1926/1927 school year as the Civic Business Programme Boys' School. In 1940, still with this name, it was merged with the First Civic Girls' School. This had been founded in 1889, when it was known as the State Advanced Girls' School; in the 1923/1924 school year it was turned into a civic school and known as the State Civic Girls' School. In 1936 it had another name change, becoming the Civic Business Programme Girls' School, but was almost immediately renamed the Knjeginja Zorka State Civic Girls' School. The combined boys' and girls' school was known as a State Coeducational School from 1944, but underwent several name changes up to 944: General Lower Secondary School, Second Coeducational Lower Secondary School, etc. The archive material was acquired by the Archive in 1961.

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1886 to 1944, and is in 78 volumes, classified and accessible, with a summary inventory.

97. Girls' Private Occupational and Industrial Programme School in the Institute of St JosephSarajevo (Call no. ŽŠSJ-114)

The institute was founded in 1882, and later the Sisters of the Congregation of Divine Love founded this school there. The archive material was acquired by the Archive in 1963.

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1929 to 1945, and is in 5 volumes, classified and accessible, with an analytical inventory.

98. Girls' Private Occupational School in the Institute of St VincentSarajevo (Call no. ŽZSV-269)

The archive material was acquired by the Archive when it acquired that of the 9th Public Primary School.

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1939 to 1944, and is in 2 volumes, classified and accessible, with an analytical inventory.

99. St Vincent Civic Girls' School – Sarajevo (Call no. ŽGŠ-254)

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1939 to 1945, and is in 60 volumes, classified and accessible.

100. State General Boys' Lower SchoolSarajevo (Call no. DMNŠ-410)

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1942 to 1943, and is in 5 volumes, classified and accessible.

101. General Coeducational Lower Secondary SchoolSarajevo (Call no. MONŠ-411)

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1941 to 1944, and is in 3 boxes and 3 volumes, classified and accessible.

102. Vocational Civic School – Sarajevo (Call no. SGŠ-257)

This school was associated with the 5th public primary school.

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1932 to 1936, and is in 5 volumes and one fascicle, classified and accessible.

103. National Advanced Girls' School – Sarajevo (Call no. DVDŠ-412)

The school arose out of the four-grade girls' school founded in Sarajevo in 1879. In 1893 the growing number of pupils led to three of the grades being formed into a separate school known as the Advanced Girls' School, the name it retained until the 1923/1924 school year, when it was turned into a civic school. The Archive acquired the schools' records in 1961 from the 9th Public Primary School in Sarajevo.

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1883 to 1944, and is in 19=5 volumes, classified and accessible, with a summary inventory.

104. Advanced Girls' School in the Institute of the Sisters of Mercy of St Vincent – Sarajevo (Call no. VDVŠ-128)

The school was founded in 1883 by the Sisters of Mercy of St Vincent in Sarajevo. It was initially governed by the Vrhbosna Archbishopric, but later came under the full jurisdiction and governance of the Sisters of Mercy. The school was of the nature of a lower vocational school. By decision of the Provincial Government of 30 July 1912, the school was recognized as a public institution, operating under the name Advanced Girls' School until 1924, when it was renamed the Roman Catholic Civic Business Programme School in the Institute of St Vincent, operating until 1945, with no further name changes. The archive material was acquired by the Archive in 1961 from the 9th Public Primary School in Sarajevo.

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1883 to 1943, and is in 6 volumes, classified and accessible, with an analytical inventory.

105. Advanced Girls' School in the Institute of St JosephSarajevo (Call no. ŽGŠJ-113)

The Institute of St Joseph was opened in Sarajevo in 1882, and in it the Sisters of the Congregation of Divine Love opened first an Advanced Girls' School and then, a little later, a Girls' Vocational Occupational School. The school was granted public status by the Provincial Government on 30 July 1912. The Archive acquired the school's records in 1961 along with that of other Catholic confessional schools.

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1908 to 1945, and is in 179 volumes, classified and accessible, with an analytical inventory.

106. Advanced Muslim Girl's School – Sarajevo (Call no. MVDŠ-35)

The school arose out of the Muslim Girls' Primary School, probably in the school year 1914/1915. Part of it became the Second Girls' Civic Business Programme School, known after 1926 as the Civic Girls' School and attended by children of other confessions too. In 1940 it remained the only school in Bosnia and Herzegovina by that name. The archive material was acquired just after the Archive's establishment in 1948.

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1901 to 1928, and is in 6 volumes, classified and accessible, with a summary inventory.

107. (Serbian Sisters' Circle) School – Sarajevo (Call no. ŠKSS-112)

The archive material was acquired by the Archive in 1961. It is incomplete, covering the period from 1935 to 1941, in 17 volumes, classified and accessible.

108. National Public Advanced Girls' School – Sarajevo (Call no. DVDS-414)

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1889 to 1923, in 15 volumes, classified and accessible.

109. Public Advanced Girls' School – Sarajevo (Call no. NVDŠ-415)

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1890 to 1923, and is in 15 volumes, classified and accessible.

110. Public Girls' School – Sarajevo (Call no. NOŠ-416)

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1881 to 1918, and is in 46 volumes, classified and accessible.

Secondary Schools

111. First Grammar SchoolSarajevo (Call no. PG-235)

The first Boys' Grammar School in Sarajevo was established by order of the Provincial Government for Bosnia and Herzegovina no. 19871 of 20 September 1879, and opened on 6 November that year. On 30 August 1883 it was renamed the National Grand Grammar School, with a further change of name in the school year 1923/1924, when it became the First National Boys' General-Programme Grammar School in Sarajevo. In 1945 it became known as the First Boys' General-Programme Grammar School. On 9 January 1946 a grammar-school course began in the school, known as the Partisans' Grammar School, which ran until 1948. The archive material was acquired by the Archive in several stages from 1965 on.

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1881 to 1993, and is in 113 boxes and 187 volumes, classified and accessible, with a summary inventory.

112. Second Grammar SchoolSarajevo (Call no. DG-248)

In 1905 the Minor General-Programme School, the precursor of the Second Grammar School, was established. It has been known at various times as the Grand General-Programme School, the Franz Joseph I Grand General-Programme School, the Second National General-Programme Grammar School, and the Ognjen Prica Grammar School. The archive material was acquired by the Archive in several stages from 1966 on.

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1908 to 1974, and is in 69 boxes and 175 volumes, classified and accessible in part, with a summary inventory.

113. Third Grammar SchoolSarajevo (Call no. TG-419)

The school was known when it first opened in 1948 as the National Lower General-Programme Grammar School, changed to the Incomplete Higher Grammar School in 1953 and to the Coeducational Grammar School from the school year 1955/1956. The following year it was known as the Fifth Grammar School, and from 1957 to 1965 as the Third Grammar School. In 1965 it was again renamed, this time the Braća Ribar Grammar School, by which name it was known until 1980. In 1981 it had yet another name-change, to the Braća Ribar School for Secondary Programme Education and Training. It is now simply known as the Third Grammar School.

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1948 to 1995, and is in 107 volumes, classified and accessible, with a summary inventory.

114. First Girls' General-Programme Grammar SchoolSarajevo (Call no. PŽRG-177)

During the Austro-Hungarian period, girls in Bosnia and Herzegovina were not admitted as registered secondary school pupils, but took the end-of-year examinations as private pupils. It was only at the end of the occupation, on 2 August 1918, that an announcement was issued that girls would be allowed to enrol as registered pupils on an interim basis. In 1918/1919 the National Council granted the right of enrolment as registered pupils to girls who had passed grades I and II. In 1919/1920 this was finally extended to all secondary-school pupils. In 1923/1924 the girls' section of the boys' grammar school was turned into a separate school, known as the National Girls' General-Programme Grammar School. The archive material of the school was acquired by the Archive in 1963 from the First Girls' Grammar School.

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1924 to 1956, and is in 94 boxes and 76 volumes, classified and accessible, with a summary inventory.

115. Second Girls' General-Programme Grammar SchoolSarajevo (Call no. DŽRG-178)

This school was established by a decree of 21 August 1941. The archive material was acquired by the Archive in 1963.

The material, which is complete, covers the period from 1941 to 1956, and is in 48 boxes and 56 volumes, classified and accessible, with a summary inventory.

116. Shari'a Grammar School – Sarajevo (Sign ŠG-30)

The school was founded on 25 November 1918 by decision of the National Council for Bosnia and Herzegovina. It operated as a school of the oriental-classical type, following which its pupils could continue their studies at the Faculty of Islamic Theology or other faculties. The Archive acquired the archive material with that of the Second Boys' Grammar School in 1966.

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1918 to 1945, and is in 10 boxes and 29 volumes, classified and accessible, with a summary inventory.

117. Private Full Girls' General-Programme Grammar School with public status in the Institute of St VincentSarajevo (Call no. PZRGV-126)

The school was opened in 1941 by the Sisters of Mercy of St Vincent with the same curriculum as the state grammar schools, and continued in operation until 1945, when it and all other private schools were abolished. The archive material was acquired by the Archive in 1961.

The material, which is complete, covers the period from 1941 to 1945, and is in 10 volumes, classified and accessible, with a summary inventory.

118. Teacher-Training SchoolSarajevo (Call no. UŠ-125)

In 1882 a teacher training course was set up by order of the Provincial Government for Bosnia and Herzegovina, becoming a full-time teacher-training school in 1886. At first the school provided a three-year course, increased to four years in 1900, and continuing until the outbreak of World War I. In 1914 it moved to Derventa, though the Girls' Teacher Training School, established by order of the Provincial Government on 21 August 1911, remained in Sarajevo, and a boys' section was set up. In 1926, by decision of the Ministry of Education of the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes, the girls' and boys' sections were split, creating a separate Boys' Teacher Training School. This operated as a separate teacher training school until the school year 1934/1935, when it again merged with the Girls' Teacher Training College. From then on it operated as a coeducational teacher training school, under several different names: National Coeducational Teacher Training School, Teacher Training School, Boys' Teacher Training School, Girls' Teacher Training School, Queen Maria Coeducational Teacher Training School, Joint Teacher Training School, Nurija Pozderac Teacher Training School. There were also girls' and boys' teacher training schools in the Institute of St Joseph, the archive material of which is included in this holding. The Archive acquired the material in 1973 from the Nurija Pozderac Teacher Training School.

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1895 to 1972, and is in 51 boxes and 401 volumes, classified and accessible, with a summary inventory.

119. Secondary Technical SchoolSarajevo (Call no. STŠ-124)

The school was established in 1889 as a secondary school for children of 14 and over. In the school year 1906/1907 it also operated as the Forestry School. November 1910 saw the reopening of the Technical Vocational School, where a Craftsmen's Book-Keeping Evening School was opened in 1920, operating for three years. In the school year 1932/1933 the Boys' Occupational School, dating back to 1893 as a lower school, was merged with the Secondary Technical School. In addition, an Occupational Training School had been set up in the Coeducational Occupational School in 1900, with three grades offering courses in several occupations, beginning in 1905, when the school was also renamed the National Secondary Technical School of the Chivalric King Alexander I the Unifier and the Boys' Occupational School. In 1934 two schools were merged with it: the Vocational Textiles School in Sarajevo and the Gunsmiths' Trade School of Užice. The archive material was acquired by the Archive in 1969 from the Electro-Mechanics Centre.

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1920 to 1944, and is in 104 volumes, classified and accessible, with a summary inventory.

Occupational, Business and Industrial Schools

120. Provincial Occupational School – Sarajevo (Call no. ZZŠ-198)

The school was established in 1893 at the suggestion of the Provincial Government for Bosnia and Herzegovina. It provided a four-year education for pupils who had completed their primary education. After World War I it continued operating under the name Boys' Occupational School in Sarajevo. In 1934, by ruling of the Ministry of Trade and Industry, the Vocational Textiles School in Sarajevo and the Gunsmiths' School of Užice were merged with this school.

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1893 to 1945, and is in 60 volumes, classified and accessible, with a summary inventory.

121. Apprentices' School – Sarajevo (Call no. OOŠ-496)

The school was established by the Provincial Government for Bosnia and Herzegovina in 1900 to train apprentices in a variety of occupations and trades. At first it provided only a two-year course, later extended to three. The Archive acquired the school's records in 1956 from the Coeducational Business School of Sarajevo.

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1900 to 1931, and is in 45 hard-cover volumes, classified and accessible, with a summary inventory.

122. Girls' Vocational Occupational School – Sarajevo (Call no. ŽSZ-497)

The school was established by order of the Provincial Government for Bosnia and Herzegovina on 18 October 1913 for the purpose of training girls to make underwear and outer garments. There were two departments, one for underwear and the other for tailoring outer garments. The school operated under the same name until the school year 1940/1941, when the growing number of pupils led to the establishment of the First and Second Girls' Vocational Schools. The archive material was acquired by the Archive in 1954.

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1913 to 1941, and is in 31 boxes and 606 volumes, classified and accessible in part, with a summary inventory.

123. First Girls' Vocational School – Sarajevo (Sign PŽSŠ-25)

The school was founded in 1941, arising out of the Girls' Vocational Occupational School in Sarajevo. It was abolished by order of the Government of the Republic of Bosnia (no. 851/47), and replaced by the National Industrial Textiles School. The archive material was acquired by the Archive in 1954.

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1939 to 1942, and is in 8 boxes and 59 volumes, classified and accessible, with a summary inventory.

124. Second National Girls' Vocational School – Sarajevo (Call no. DŽSŠ-26)

The school opened in 1941 with two departments, one for making underwear and the other for tailoring outer garments. It was abolished at the same time as the First Girls' Vocational School by order of the Government of the Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina (no. 851/47), becoming part of the newly-established National Industrial Textiles School. The Archive acquired the archive material together with that of the First Girls' Vocational School in 1954.

The material, which is complete, covers the period from 1941 to 1947, and is in 6 boxes and 76 volumes, classified and accessible, with a summary inventory.

125. Vocational Occupational School for Woven Textiles – Sarajevo (Call no. SZTP-498)

The school opened in 1927, and had two grades. It was open to pupils who had completed at least two grades of secondary school. In 1934, by ruling of the Ministry of Trade and Industry, it was merged with the Boys' Occupational School, where it formed a separate department. The Archive acquired the archive material in 1956 along with that of the Boys' Occupational School.

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1927 to 1940, and is in 10 boxes, classified and accessible, with an analytical inventory.

126. Girls' Vocational School in the Holy Trinity Institute – Sarajevo (Call no. ŽŠPT-500)

The school was opened by the Sisters of Mercy of St Vincent in Novo Sarajevo to train girls in sewing and tailoring. It was abolished in 1945. The archive material was acquired by the Archive in 1961

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1941 to 1945, and is in one volume, classified and accessible, with an analytical inventory.

127. Girls' Vocational Occupational School in the Institute of St Joseph of the Daughters of Divine Love – Sarajevo (Call no. ŽSSJ-501)

The Institute of St Joseph was founded in 1882, and the Daughters of Divine Love established a primary school, a civic school and a secondary vocational school under its auspices. The Girls' Vocational School for sewing underwear and tailoring outer garments was established by the Provincial Government by Order of 18 October 1913. The school provided vocational education consisting of a preparatory year and three grades of vocational school. On completion of their vocational training, the pupils continued working in workshops. It was abolished in 1945 along with the other confessional schools. The archive material of the school was acquired by the Archive in 1961 along with that of the other confessional schools.

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1913 to 1945, and is in 32 volumes, classified and accessible, with an analytical inventory.

128. Private Girls' Occupational School in the institute of St VincentSarajevo (Call no. PŽSV-502)

The school was established to train girls in sewing and tailoring. After their first preparatory year, the girls worked in two vocational departments, one for tailoring outer garments, the other for sewing underwear. This was then followed by a year's practical course. The archive material was acquired by the Archive in 1961 along with that of the other confessional schools.

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1939 to 1944, and is in 13 volumes, classified and accessible, with an analytical inventory.

129. National Vocational Domestic Science SchoolSarajevo (Call no. DSD-503)

The school opened in Sarajevo on 20 November 1919. The archive material was acquired by the Archive in 1961.

The material, which is complete, covers the period from 1933 to 1940, and is in 8 boxes and 28 volumes, classified and accessible, with a summary inventory.

130. National Vocational Occupational Book-Keeping SchoolSarajevo (Call no. DZDŠ-504)

The school opened in 1920 as part of the National Secondary Technical School in Sarajevo. From the school year 1933/1934 it was known as the Craftsmen's Book-Keeping Evening School. On graduating from this school, pupils could continue their education at the National Secondary Technical School. The Archive acquired the archive material in 1969. From the Electro-Technical Centre in Sarajevo.

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1928 to 1942, and is in 18 volumes, classified and accessible.

131. Vocational Continuation Occupational-Programme School of the National Secondary Technical SchoolSarajevo (Call no. SPZT-507)

Schools known as continuation schools, which were mixed in type, existed alongside lower vocational schools. The archive material was acquired by the Archive in 1961.

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1932 to 1941, and is in 9 volumes, classified and accessible, with a summary inventory.

132. Boys' Vocational Continuation School (Apprentices' School) – Sarajevo (Call no. MSPŠ-117)

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1937 to 1941, and is in 54 volumes, classified and accessible.

133. Occupational School – Sarajevo (Call no. OOŠ-509)

The archive material was acquired by the Archive in 1956 from the Coeducational Business School, Sarajevo.

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1919 to 1935, and is in 7 volumes, classified and accessible.

National and Workers' Universities and Courses

134. Continuation Course at the Muslim Girls' School – Sarajevo (Call no. PTM-413)

The archive material was acquired by the Archive when it was established in 1948.

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1901 to 1928, and is in 6 volumes, classified and accessible.

135. Apprentices' Evening SchoolSarajevo (Call no. VŠŠ-120)

The archive material was acquired by the Archive in 1951. .

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1902 to 1931, and is in 43 volumes and one fascicle, classified and accessible.

Culture

Cultural, Educational and Humanitarian Associations

136. “Proleter” Workers' Choral Society – Sarajevo (Call no. P-153)

Founded in1905, the society is still operating under the same name. The material, which the Archive purchased from Miko Vukojević in 1962, consists of documents, bibliographical data and photographs.

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1905 to 1940, and is in one box, classified and accessible, with an analytical inventory.

137. “Cankar” Slav Cultural and Educational Society – Sarajevo (Call no. C-32)

The first Slav society in Sarajevo, known as the Slav Club, dates from the Austro-Hungarian period, and later gave rise to the Cankar Society, which was dissolved in 1940 and revived on 1 July 1945, lasting only until 1951. It was revived again during the 1992-1995 war. The archive material was acquired by the Archive in 1954, and consists of correspondence, the minutes of meetings, protocol records, articles and notes.

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1908 to 1951, and is in 11 boxes and five volumes, classified and accessible, with a summary inventory.

138. “Narodna uzdanica” Muslim Cultural Society – Sarajevo (Call no. NU-14)

Founded on 20 October 1924, the society had its headquarters in Sarajevo but covered the whole of Bosnia and Herzegovina. It was particularly prominent between 1941 and 1945, when it was known as the “Narodna uzdanica” Croatian Muslim Society. It was barred in 1949.

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1925 to 1945, and is in 50 boxes and 6 volumes, classified and accessible, with a summary inventory.

139. “Napredak” Croatian Cultural Society – Sarajevo (Sign N-23)

Founded in 1902, with its headquarters in Sarajevo. It rapidly established branches in almost every city and town in Bosnia and Herzegovina. It ceased operating during World War I, but was revived after the war and established numerous branches outside Bosnia and Herzegovina. It was barred in 1942 but again revived in 1992, and is now operating very successfully in almost every corner of the globe. Most of the material of this society is housed in the Archive of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1945 to 1947, and is in one box, classified and accessible, with a summary inventory.

140. “Preporod” Muslim Cultural Society (Call no. P-10)

The society was formed from the merger of “Gajret” and “Narodna uzdanica” in 1946. The archive material consists of the minutes of board meetings, and details of the society's activities and involvement. The material was acquired by the Archive in 1949 from the Preporod Liquidation Board.

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1946 to 1948, and is in 13 boxes and 7 volumes, classified and accessible, with a summary inventory.

141. Inter-Society Board of Cultural and Educational Societies (“Prosvjeta”, “Napredak” and “Preporod”) – Sarajevo (Call no. MO-98)

The material, which is incomplete, dates from 1949, and is in a single fascicle, classified and accessible.

142. “Gajret” Muslim Charitable Association – Sarajevo (Call no. G-4)

The association was founded on 20 February 1903, and was taken over by the Muslim National Organization in 1907. Early in World War I a commissariat was introduced into the association. Revived after World War I, its activities were again suspended in World War II and revived at the end of the war, until 1949. The Archive acquired the archive material in 1949.

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1903 to 1941, and is in 88 boxes and 29 volumes, classified and accessible, with a summary inventory.

143. “Merhamet” Muslim Charitable Association – Sarajevo (Call no. M-9)

The association was founded in 1913 and abolished in 1949. The Archive acquired the archive material in 1955.

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 192 to 1946, and is in 18 boxes and 15 volumes, classified and accessible, with a summary inventory.

144. “Jediler” Muslim Humanitarian Society – Sarajevo (Call no. J-175)

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1939 to 1942, and is in one box, classified and accessible.

145. “Bratstvo” Muslim Humanitarian and Cultural Society – Sarajevo (Call no. BMHK-427)

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1933 to 1943, and is in one box, classified and accessible.

Sports Societies and Associations

146. Sarajevo Hunting Society – Sarajevo (Call no. SLD-99)

The society was founded on 24 July 1895. The material consists of correspondence, filed by protocol number.

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1895 to 1905, and is in one box, classified and accessible.

147. Federation of Hunting Societies – Sarajevo (Sign SVLD-100)

Consists of correspondence and minutes of general meetings.

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1942 to 1945, and is in one box, classified and accessible.

148. “Sašk” Sarajevo Amateur Sports Club – Sarajevo (Call no. Sašk-94)

The club was active from 1925 to 1941. The archive material was acquired in 1951, and consists of correspondence and minutes of meetings.

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1925 to 1936, and is in 3 boxes and 4 volumes, classified and accessible, with an analytical inventory.

149. “Sloga” Sports Club – Sarajevo (Call no. SKS-93)

The club was active from 1920 to 1941. The archive material was purchased in 1963, and consists of correspondence, minutes of meetings and photographs.

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1936 to 1940, and is in one box, classified and accessible, with an analytical inventory.

150. Sokol Movement – Sarajevo (Call no. SP-131)

The Sokol Movement [a youth and gymnastics organization] was active from 1906 to 1941. The archive material was purchased by the Archive in 1961 from the antiquarian bookshop of Svjetlost Publishing Corporation in Sarajevo, and consists of documents, posters, brochures and photographs.

Editorial offices of periodicals and newspapers

151. “Nada” Periodical for Instruction, Entertainment and Art – Sarajevo (Call no. N-17)

The periodical was issued by the Provincial Government for Bosnia and Herzegovina, and was launched by Konstantin-Kosta Herman. Among its contributors was the well-known writer and poet Silvije Strahimir Kranjčević. The periodical came out in two handsomely-produced editions, one in the Latin script and the other in Cyrillic. The archive material was acquired by the Archive in 1951 from the National Museum.

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1894 to 1903, and is in 8 boxes, 6 volumes and two fascicles, classified and accessible.

152. “Gajret” Newspaper for Social Issues and Popular Education – Sarajevo (Call no. G-5)

The periodical ran from 1907 to 1940, with a number of breaks. The archive material was acquired from the Liquidation Board in 1949, along with that of the “Gajret” charitable association.

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1926 to 1940, and is in one box, classified and accessible, with an analytical inventory.

Miscellaneous

153. Management Board of the Social Centre – Sarajevo (Call no. UVDD-579)

The Social Centre opened on 2 January 1899, and became the National Theatre in 1922.

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1898 to 1919, and is in one box, classified and accessible.

154. Society of Croatian Catholic Men – Sarajevo (Call no. DKM-27)

The society was founded on 31 March 1928. The archive material was acquired by the Archive in 1954, and consists of correspondence, minutes and a list of members.

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1921 to 1945, and is in 3 boxes, classified and accessible, with a summary inventory.

155. Society of Croatian Catholic Women – Sarajevo (Call no. DKŽ-28)

The society was founded on 16 November 1919 as the Croatian Catholic Women's Association, renamed the Society of Croatian Catholic Women in 1931. The society was barred in 1945. The archive material was acquired by the Archive in 1954, and consists of correspondence and a record of minutes of meetings.

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1922 to 1945, and is in one box, partly classified, accessible, and with a summary inventory.

156. Gajret Girls' Boarding School – Sarajevo (Call no. GŽI-7)

The archive material was provided in 1949 by the Preporod Liquidation Board.

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1926 to 1941, and is in one box, classified and accessible, with a summary inventory.

157. Conference of Austro-Hungarian Ornithologists – Sarajevo (Call no. KO-224)

The conference was held from 26 to 30 September 1989. The archive material from the conference was singled out from the holding of the Nada editorial office, and consists mainly of letters from the conference participants.

The material, which is incomplete, dates from 1889, and is in one box, classified and accessible, with a summary inventory.

158. First Yugoslav Rotarian's Conference – Sarajevo (Call no. RK-149)

The archive material relates to the proceedings of the conference, which was held in 1931. The material, which is incomplete, dates from 1931, and is in one box, classified and accessible, with an analytical inventory.

159. Society for the Study of the East – Sarajevo (Call no. DPI-96)

The archive material was acquired by the Archive in 1961 from the writer Hifzo Bjelevac, and consists of studies, brochures etc.

The material, which is incomplete, dates from 1926, and is in two boxes, classified and accessible.

THE ECONOMY

Banks and Financial Institutions

160. Sarajevo City Savings Bank (Call no. GŠ-288)

The City Savings Bank opened for business in 1922. The Electric-Power Station, Gasworks, Tramways and Water Company merged with it, for ease of management and development. It was liquidated in 1946.

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1922 to 194, and is in 51 boxes, unclassified but accessible.

161. Gajret Loan and Business Cooperative (Call no. GKZ-8)

The Cooperative was founded by the Gajret Association. The archive material of the Loan Cooperative was acquired by the Archive along with that of the Gajret Association in 1949.

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1933 to 1941, and is in 14 boxes, classified and accessible.

162. Narodna uzdanica Loan Cooperative (Call no. ZNU-15)

The archive material of the Narodna uzdanica Loan Cooperative was acquired in 1951 with the material of the Narodna uzdanica Society, which founded the Cooperative.

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1942 to 1945, and is in 24 boxes, classified and accessible.

163. Loan Cooperative of the “Prosvjeta” Serbian Cultural Society (Call no. P-95)

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1934 to 1941, and is in 3 boxes, classified and accessible.

Business Associations and Directorates

164. Association of Businessmen of Sarajevo City and County (Call no. TU-21)

The association's activities began in 1906. Its mission was to hold meetings and introduce businessmen to one another, and to exchange experience relating to the advancement of trade and commerce. The Businessmen's Association was behind the establishment of the Chamber of Trade and Commerce for Bosnia and Herzegovina. The Association ceased operations in 1948.

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1920 to 1948, and is in 32 boxes and 12 volumes, classified and accessible, with an analytical inventory.

165. Industrialists' Association of Sarajevo (Call no. UI-292)

The Industrialists' Association was founded on 1 January 1936, and was renamed the Croatian Federation of Wholesale Traders in 1941. The archive material was acquired from the County Chamber of Trade in 1963.

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1936 to 1945, and is in 28 boxes, classified and accessible, with a summary inventory.

166. Federation of Croatian Farmers' Cooperatives (Call no. SHSZ-167)

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1934 to 1937, and is in four bundles, unclassified but accessible.

Industry and Commerce

167. Bosnia mine Semizovac – Sarajevo (Call no. BR-334)

The mine was established in 1881 to extract manganese ore in Čevljanovići (Semizovac). The archive material was acquired from the Vareš Ironworks in 1960.

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1883 to 1957, and is in 95 boxes and 30 volumes, unclassified but accessible. The languages of the material in this holding are German and the language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

168. Fabrika duhana Sarajevo - Sarajevo (Call no. FDS-466)

The cigarette factory known as Fabrika duhana Sarajevo or FDS began operating on 2 August 1880. It was located in Marindvor until 1960, when it moved to new purpose-built premises in Pofalići, marking the start of expansion in 1961, when the Polet Printing Corporation and the Obnova Cottonwool factory of Sarajevo were merged with FDS. Over the next few years another 17 enterprises engaged in the manufacture and sale of cigarettes were merged with FDS, which regularly invested in research and development. 1955 saw the launch of the Glibo machines, named after worker-constructor Šaćir Glibo, which were constantly being improved, and were both manufactured and refitted in FDS. In 1970 an agreement was signed with Philip Morris to make Marlboro cigarettes, which quickly became known world-wide. FDS has never ceased production since it was first launched. The archive material was acquired from FDS in 2002.

The material, which is complete, covers the period from 1880 to 1995, and is in 773 boxes, 3,096 files, 256 bundles, 190 cardboard boxes and 885 volumes, classified and accessible in part.

169. City Transport Corporation – Sarajevo (Call no. GRAS-446)

The corporation was founded in 1885. The archive material was acquired from GRAS, as it is known for short, in 1981.

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1895 to 1945, and is in 10 boxes, classified and accessible, with a summary inventory, in German and the language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

170. Neimar Building Corporation – Sarajevo (Call no. N-342)

Neimar was founded in 1946 as a national building corporation, taking over the archive material and operations of the Adam Till Company of Sarajevo, which had been founded in 1893. Two more building companies, Bjelašnica and Bosnarad, were merged with Neimar. The archive material was acquired from the Archive of Central Bosnia in Travnik in 1975.

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1893 to 1950, and is in 40 boxes and 93 volumes, classified and accessible, with a summary inventory.

171. Obnova Co. Ltd. for the Manufacture of Cotton Wool – Sarajevo (Call no. O-291)

The Obnova cotton wool factory was based in Grbavica, Sarajevo.

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1928 to 1945, and is in 7 boxes, classified and accessible, with a summary inventory.

172. Sarajevo Brewery – Sarajevo (Call no. SP-329)

Beer first began to be brewed in Sarajevo in May 1964, for which the credit goes to a Jewish merchant, Feldbauer. In 1870 the Slovene Andrija Gerdouč built a new brewery in Kovačići. In 1881, following the Austro-Hungarian occupation, Heinrich Levi opened a private brewery in Sarajevo, on the site of the present-day brewery. In 1882 George Aschenbrenner built his own brewery on the Koševo brook. On 28 February 1893 these three breweries were merged into a single joint stock company known as the Joint Stock Brewery, which soon gained a monopoly over the market in Bosnia and Herzegovina, becoming a single large corporation in the hands of the joint-stock company, the shareholders of which were all influential foreigners. From 1931 to 1936 the Sarajevo brewery was in crisis, but production was restored in 1936/1937, and between then and 1939/1940 beer sales almost tripled. The archive material was acquired from the Brewery in 1969.

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1893 to 1945, and is in 52 boxes and 15 volumes, classified and accessible, with a summary inventory.

173. Visokogradnja Building Corporation – Sarajevo (Call no. VG-480)

The archive material was acquired from Sarajevo County Council in 1961.

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1937 to 1955, and is in 5 boxes, classified and accessible, with a summary inventory.

174. Railway Machine Shop – Sarajevo (Call no. Ž-330)

The decision to build a railway machine shop in Sarajevo was adopted by Austria-Hungary in 1890. The machine shop occupied part of the site still occupied now by Vaso Miskin Crni [see below]. It is said that in 1907 there were fourteen railway machine shops in Bosnia and Herzegovina carrying out service and repair works. That year the Railway Machine Shop in Sarajevo was renamed the Central Machine Shop. The work it carried out, as against the other machine shops, led to its becoming the Main Machine Shop.

The Railway Machine Shop continued in operation after the end of World War I and the formation of the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes. As before, its basic activity throughout the inter-war period was the overhaul of narrow-gauge locomotives, carriages and goods wagons, involving several specialist groups of workers: foundrymen, lathe operators, smiths, leather-workers, electricians, metalworkers, paint-shop workers etc.

At the end of World War II, as enemy forces retreated from Sarajevo, they damaged more than 25% of all the machine shop's plant and equipment, but failed to put it out of service.

During the Socialist period, the Main Railway Machine Shop known as the Vaso Miskin Crni Railway Machine Shop took a new course, gradually developing from an enterprise that for decades had been repairing and overhauling narrow-gauge railway carriages, goods wagons and locomotives into an industrial enterprise. In early June 1959 the Vaso Miskin Crni Railway Machine Shop was renamed the Vaso Miskin Crni Railway Vehicle Factory, the name by which it operated until July 1964. By that time its production line had again expanded, and it was accordingly renamed the Vaso Miskin Crni Transport Products and Services Industry. On 18 August 1972 it became part of the Energoinvest conglomerate.

The archive material was acquired from the corporation in 1971 and 1985.

The material, which is incomplete, covers the period from 1920 to 1963, and is in 574 boxes and 293 volumes, classified and accessible, with a summary inventory.

INDIVIDUAL AND FAMILY HOLDINGS

175. Alibegovići – Derventa (Call no. O-A-165)

The Alibegović merchant house of Derventa.

This holding consists of a wealth of mercantile and financial correspondence of the Alibegović family, mainly in the form of volumes of copies (Copier Buch) with the replies from the Alibegović's business partners. It also includes about 80 letters from various merchant houses to the Alibegović merchant house.

Material: incomplete, time frame: 1879-1908; in 7 boxes of books and letters, partly preserved, partly classified on the registry principle, partly accessible; languages: the language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina; script: Cyrillic, Latin.

176. Andrić Dr. Vlado – Sarajevo (Call no. O-AV-89)

Andrić Dr. Vlado (1882-1932), lawyer, member of the Assembly of Bosnia and Herzegovina and senator, of Sarajevo.

This holding consists of Dr. Vlado Andrić's extensive documentation on his defence of Vasilje Grđić and other accused in the so-called high treason trial of 1916/1917, and documentation on attempts to resolve the agrarian question in Bosnia and Herzegovina, together with correspondence, private documents and some of Andrić's written works.

Material: incomplete, time frame: 1906-1932; 3 boxes of documents, well preserved, thematically classified, accessible; languages: the language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina, German; script: Cyrillic, Latin; with analytical inventory.

177. Arnautović Šerif - Mostar (Call no. O-ŠA-380)

Arnautović Šerif (1874-1935), Vakuf director, member of the Assembly of Bosnia and Herzegovina and senator, of Mostar.

The holding consists of a small quantity of documents, correspondence and printed matter relating to vakuf, agrarian and party issues.

Material: fragmentary, time frame: 1903-1935; one box of documents, well preserved, thematically classified and accessible; languages: the language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina, German; script: Latin, Cyrillic; analytical inventory.

178. Bajac Ljubomir – Sarajevo (Call no. O-BLJ-67)

Bajac Ljubomir (1890-1951), choir leader and music teacher, of Sarajevo.

This holding is a fragment only of the long and significant work of this well known Sarajevo choir leader, consisting of a certain amount of musical material, compositions and notes of folk songs and dances, and two manuscripts by other authors.

Material: fragmentary, time frame: 1913-1950; one box of documents, well preserved, thematically classified, accessible; languages: the language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina, German; script: Latin; analytical inventory.

179. Bašagić Dr. Safvet – Sarajevo (Call no. O-BS-279)

Bašagić Dr. Safvet-beg (1870-1934), writer, orientalist, Speaker of the Assembly of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

The holding consists of original manuscripts by Safvet-bey Bašagić on literature, translations, letters from numerous writers, cultural and public workers to Safvet-bey Bašagić, personal documents, some photographs, etc.

Material: incomplete, time frame: 1885-1934; 5 boxes of documents and volumes preserved, thematically classified, accessible; languages: the language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Arabic, Turkish, Persian, German; script: Latin, arebica; with analytical inventory.

180. Belović-Bernadžikovski Jelica – Sarajevo (Call no. O-BJ-86)

Belović-Bernadžikovski Jelica (1870-1946), pedagogue and folklorist, of Sarajevo.

This small holding is a fragment only of the rich creative opus and activities of pedagogue and folklorist Jelica Belović Bernadžikovska, who lived and worked in Sarajevo and Banja Luka in the early decades of the 20th century. Of particular interest is the manuscript of her autobiography.

Material: fragmentary, time frame: 1893-1909; one box of documents, well preserved, thematically classified and accessible; languages: the language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina, German, French; script: Latin; with analytical inventory.

181. Besarović Dr. Vojislav – Sarajevo (Call no. O-BV-66)

Besarović Dr. Vojislav (1883-1941), political and public worker, member of the Assembly of Bosnia and Herzegovina, member of the Main Board of the National Council of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes in Zagreb, member of the Main Board of the National Council of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes for Bosnia and Herzegovina, member of the delegation of the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes at the St Germain peace conference in 1919, vice-chairman of Sarajevo City Council, chairman of Prosvjeta Serbian Cultural and Educational Society, and honorary consul of the Kingdom of Denmark in Sarajevo.

The holding, though incomplete, includes not only documents relating to the many posts held by and activities of Dr. Vojislav Besarović, but also material and photographs of his incarceration in Austro-Hungarian prisons after his conviction in the Banja Luka high treason trial, and of his work in the Sokol district of Sarajevo and the Sarajevo Chamber of Commerce and Trade.

Material: incomplete, time frame: 1887-1941; 4 boxes of documents, well preserved, classified on the registry principle and thematically and accessible; languages: the language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina, German, French, English, Danish; script: Cyrillic, Latin; with analytical inventory.

182. Bušatlić Ajni-Abdulah – Sarajevo (Call no. O-BA-88)

Bušatlić Ajni-Abdulah (1871-1946), shari'a judge and professor at the Shari'a Judges' School in Sarajevo.

The holding consists of documents from the Supreme Shari'a Court for Bosnia and Herzegovina, shari'a legislation and the shari'a code of the Islamic Community, lectures given at the Shari'a Judges' School, and press cuttings for the period 1941-1946.

Material: fragmentary, time frame: 1930-1938; 3 boxes of documents and lecture notes, well preserved, partly classified on the registry principle and accessible; languages: the language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Turkish; script: Latin, arebica.

182. Ćurčići – Sarajevo (O-Ć-223)

The major land-owning house of the Ćurčić family of Sarajevo.

The holding consists of title deeds, correspondence, personal documents, financial documents, defters and income and expenditure accounts books.

Material: incomplete, time frame: 1858-1934; 6 boxes of books and documents, well preserved, thematically classified, accessible; languages: the language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Turkish, German; script: Latin, arebica; with a summary inventory.

183. Despići – Sarajevo (Call no. O-D-19)

The Despić merchant house of Sarajevo.

This holding consists of the commercial correspondence and books (more than 50 defters of varying sizes) of Niko Ristić and Jovo and Alekso Nikolić-Despić, commercial and private correspondence, and notes and documents of Makso Despić and other members of the family, along with documentation from Jeftan Despić's Bill-Posting Institute in Sarajevo.

Material: complete, time frame: 1804-1918; 15 boxes of books and documents, well preserved, partly classified, partly accessible; languages: the language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina, German, Greek, Turkish; script: Cyrillic, Latin, Gothic; with analytical inventory.

184. Dvorniković Ljudevit – Sarajevo (Call no. O-DLJ-170)

Dvorniković Ljudevit (1861-1933), pedagogue and writer.

The holding consists of personal documents, letters to Ljudevit Dvorniković, his own writings, and brochures dealing with pedagogy, psychology and literature.

Material: fragmentary, time frame: 1889-1933; one box of brochures and documents, well preserved, thematically classified, accessible; languages: the language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina; script: Latin; with analytical inventory.

185. Đurđević Isidor – Sarajevo (Call no. O-ĐI-226)

Đurđević Isidor (1887-1963), publisher and book-seller, of Sarajevo.

The holding consists of personal documents, private correspondence and the literary efforts of Iso Đurđević, material relating to his publishing activities, contracts with authors on the publication of their works and translations, letters from writers, artists, public and cultural workers and other individuals and organizations to Iso Đurđević, the original works and translations of various authors, and some photographs, caricatures and financial documentation.

Material: complete, time frame: 1898-1963; 16 boxes of documents, well preserved, thematically classified, accessible; languages: the language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina; script: Cyrillic, Latin; with summary-analytical inventory.

186. Farčići – Korčula (Call no. O-F-20)

The Farčić family of Korčula.

The holding consists of literary works, correspondence etc.

Material: incomplete, time frame: 1626-1896; 8 boxes of documents, damaged, unclassified and inaccessible; languages: Latin, Italian; script: Latin.

187. Hadžiristići – Sarajevo (Call no. O-HR-220)

The Hadžiristić merchant house of Sarajevo.

The holding consists of commercial and other correspondence, and documentation giving details of the Serbian Orthodox parish in Sarajevo and on the Russian consul, Shulepnikov. The Archive of BiH also holds part of the Hadžiristić family's archive material.

Material: fragmentary, time frame: 1816-1897; one box of documents, well preserved, unclassified, partly accessible; languages: the language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina; script: Cyrillic.

188. Hol Ferdinand – Sarajevo (Call no. O-HF-105)

Hol Ferdinand (1862-1946), professor of forestry, Sarajevo.

The holding consists of manuscripts dealing with the afforestation of karst areas, records and details of students and the curriculum of the Forestry School in Sarajevo (1907) and details of final-year students taking the forestry and technical support staff course in Sarajevo and Banja Luka (1907-1928).

Material: fragmentary, time frame: 1899-1928; one box of documents, well preserved, partly classified, accessible; languages: the language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina, German; script: Latin.

189. Ilešić Fran – Ljubljana (Call no. O-IF-104)

Ilešić Fran (1871-1942), literary historian, professor at the University of Zagreb, publicist, language editor, and chairman of the Polish-Yugoslav League.

The fund consists of letters from relatives, friends, writers, cultural workers and institutions to Fran Ilešić, along with his own manuscripts and four manuscripts by Jozef Golabek, a Polish writer and translator, and numerous newspapers, periodicals and press cuttings.

Material: incomplete, time frame: 1888-1941; 14 boxes of documents, well preserved, partly classified and partly accessible; languages: the language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Slovenian, Polish; script: Latin.

190. Irby Adelina Paulina – Sarajevo (Call no. O-API-381)

Adelina Paulina Irby (1831-1911) was an educator and benefactor.(12)  

The holding consists mainly of letters from Miss Irby and Adolf Breslauer of Daruvar to Joko Marković in Pakrac. Though fragmentary, this legacy of Miss Irby's sheds much light on her humanitarian mission and work in this part of the world, particularly in helping, caring for and educating orphan children during the uprising in Bosnia and Herzegovina in 1875 and at the time of the occupation in 1878.

Material: fragmentary, time frame: 1875-1882; one box of documents, well preserved, classified, accessible; languages: German, the language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina; script: Gothic, Latin, Cyrillic; with analytical inventory.

191. Jeftanovići – Sarajevo (Call no. O-J-283)

The Jeftanović merchant house of Sarajevo.

The holding consists of commercial and financial documentation and miscellaneous correspondence concerning the social, religious, national and political activities of various members of the Jeftanović family.

Material: complete, time frame: 1833-1924; 15 boxes, one bundle and 3 volumes, well preserved, classified and accessible; languages: the language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Turkish, German; script: Cyrillic, Latin, arebica, Gothic; with analytical inventory.

192. Jevtić Borivoje – Sarajevo (Call no. O-JB-50)

Jevtić Borivoje (1894-1959), writer, playwright, member of Mlada Bosna – Sarajevo.

The holding consists of personal documents and literary works and manuscripts by Borivoj Jevtić, letters to him from writers and public and cultural workers, letters from societies, the editorial offices of newspapers and periodicals, the management board of the theatre, and family correspondence.

Material: incomplete, time frame: 1904-1959; 4 boxes of documents, well preserved, classified and accessible; languages: the language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina; script: Cyrillic, Latin; with analytical inventory.

193. Kreševljaković Hamdija – Sarajevo (Call no. O-HK-219)

Kreševljaković Hamdija (1888-1959), historian, vice-chairman of the Scientific Society of Bosnia and Herzegovina, and corresponding member of the Yugoslav Academy of Sciences and Arts in Zagreb.

The holding consists of Hamdija Kreševljaković's personal documents, his letters to Muhamed Hadžijahić, some of his documents, and letters to Alija Nametak on the occasion of Hamdija Kreševljaković's death.

Material: incomplete, time frame: 1906-1959; 2 boxes of documents, well preserved, thematically classified and accessible; languages: the language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina; script: Latin; with analytical inventory.

194. Kulenović Hakija – Sarajevo (Call no. O-KH-375)

Kulenović Hakija (1905-1987), academic painter, vice-chairman of the Association of Art Teachers of Yugoslavia, and teacher at the Higher School of Pedagogy in Sarajevo.

The archive acquired the holding in its present extent from the Art Gallery of Bosnia and Herzegovina. It is not known if the Art Gallery possesses any additional written material and documentation on this artist.

Material: incomplete, time frame: 1956-1980; 2 boxes of documents, well preserved, but unclassified and inaccessible; languages: the language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina, English, French; script: Latin.

195. Maciejovski Frank – Sarajevo (Call no. O-MF-18)

Maciejovski Frank (1871-1938), composer and conductor – Sarajevo.

The holding of this very active and productive Czech composer and conductor working in Banja Luka and Sarajevo in the first half of the 20th century consists of documents and his own compositions, works by other composers, partitions and printed matter, along with some photographs and details of the launch of his own music school in Sarajevo.

Material: incomplete, time frame: 1912-1936; 16 boxes, partly preserved, partly thematically classified, partly accessible; languages: the language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina; script: Latin, Cyrillic.

196. Maldini Wildenhainski Rudolf – Sarajevo (Call no. O-RMW-382)

Maldini Wildenhainski Rudolf, writer and translator – Sarajevo.

The holding consists of original manuscripts of poems, short stories, plays, translations, travel writings, aphorisms and articles.

Material: incomplete, time frame: 1905-1915; 2 boxes, well preserved, thematically classified and accessible; languages: the language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina; script: Latin; with analytical inventory.

197. Miladinović Miloš – Sarajevo (Call no. O-MM-383)

Miladinović Miloš (1876-1934), construction entrepreneur, Sarajevo.

The holding consists of technical, financial and other documentation and some photographs, printed matter etc.

Material: incomplete, time frame: 1910-1933; 5 boxes of documents and 10 volumes, partly preserved, partly classified on the registry principle, partly accessible; languages: the language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina; script: Cyrillic, Latin.

198. Milaković Josip – Sarajevo (Call no. P-JM-164)

Milaković Josip (1862-1921), teacher and writer, Sarajevo.

The holding consists of documents, including personal documents, manuscripts and correspondence, along with some photographs, press cuttings and periodicals.

Material: complete, time frame: 1874-1921; 10 boxes of documents, well preserved, thematically classified and accessible; languages: the language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Czech; script: Latin; with analytical inventory.

199. Milićević Ivan – Sarajevo (Call no. O-IM-222)

Milićević Ivan (1868-1950), journalist and writer, editor of Sarajevski list and Osvit.

The holding consists of letters by and to Ivan Milićević, along with his writings and photographs.

Material: fragmentary, time frame: 1899-1940; one box of documents, classified and accessible in part; languages: the language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina; script: Latin.

200. Mirić Tihomir – Sarajevo (Call no. O-TM-377)

Mirić Tihomir, conductor and composer, Sarajevo.

The holding consists of correspondence, documents, printed matter, posters, photographs etc. concerning Tihomir Mirić's work at the Opera, with choirs, and in the musical life of Sarajevo in general. Part of the documentation on Tihomir Mirić is also held by the Museum of Literature and the Performing Arts of Bosnia and Herzegovina in Sarajevo.

Material: fragmentary, time frame: 1928-1983; 3 boxes of documents and one bundle, well preserved, unclassified and partly accessible; languages: the language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina, German, English, Slovenian; script: Latin, Cyrillic.

201. Mulalić Mustafa – Sarajevo (Call no. O-MM-376)

Mulalić Mustafa, journalist, writer and politician – Sarajevo.

The holding consists of the original works of an unusually productive writer, with numerous and varied texts, photographs and notes, illuminations and other contributions.

Material: complete, time frame: 1960-1978; 69 volumes and manuscripts, well preserved, thematically classified and accessible; languages: the language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina; script: Latin.

202. Musići – Zlovići – Vareš (Call no. O-MIZ-371)

The Musić and Zlović merchant families of Vareš.

This mini holding consists of two commercial defters with various other items belonging to these two families, who were probably related.

Material: fragmentary, time frame: 1830-1862; 2 volumes, damaged and unclassified, partly accessible; languages: the language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina; script: Latin.

203. Olševski Ignac – Sarajevo (Call no. O-OI-85)

Olševski Ignac, translator – Sarajevo.

The holding consists of correspondence with Ivo Andrić, Otto Babler, Hamid Dizdar, Hamza Humo, Milica Janković, Borivoj Jevtić, Gustav Krklec, Desanka Maksimović, Branislav Nušić, Roda Roda and many others, along with the manuscripts of translations and numerous contributions to newspapers and periodicals.

Material: incomplete, time frame: 1929-1934; 18 boxes of documents, well preserved, partly classified and partly accessible; languages: the language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina, German; script: Latin, Cyrillic.

204. Ostojić Jelka – Sarajevo (Sign O-JO-221)

Ostojić Jelka (1877-1963), writer and social worker – Sarajevo.

The holding consists of the personal documentation and literary works of Jela Ostojić, along with numerous periodicals and newspapers in which her writings were published.

Material: fragmentary, time frame: 1910-1962; one box of documents, well preserved and thematically classified, accessible; languages: the language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina; script: Cyrillic, Latin; with analytical inventory.

205. Papo Laura Bohoreta – Sarajevo (Call no. O-BP-168)

Papo Laura Bohoreta (1891-1941), writer – Sarajevo.

The holding consists of original manuscripts of the literary works of Laura Papa Bohoreta.

Material: fragmentary, time frame: 1927-1936; one box of documents, well preserved, thematically classified and accessible; languages: Judeo-Spanish (Sephardic); script: Latin; with analytical inventory.

206. Pišteljić Jovan – Sarajevo (Call no. O-JP-385)

Pišteljić Jovan (1838-1870), merchant, of Sarajevo.

The holding consists of a small quantity of Pišteljić's commercial correspondence with merchants in Banja Luka, Livno, Split, Novi Pazar, Trebinje and Travnik.

Material: fragmentary, time frame: 1838-1870; one box of documents, badly damaged, unclassified, partly accessible; languages: the language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina; script: Cyrillic.

207. Popović Ivan Vasin – Sarajevo (Call no. O-IVP-379)

Popović Ivan Vasin (1851-1915), journalist, writer, translator, editor of Bosansko-hercegovačke novine and Sarajevski list, manager of the Provincial Press in Sarajevo.

The holding consists of letters from the Viennese publisher Hartleben to Ivan Vasin Popović and his son Bogdan Popović, and manuscripts of original works and translations by Ivan V. Popović.

Material: incomplete, time frame: 1892-1916; 3 boxes of documents; well preserved, thematically classified and accessible; languages: the language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina, German; script: Cyrillic, Latin, Gothic; with an analytical inventory.

208. Prodan Don Ivo – Zadar (Call no. O-DIP-44)

Prodan Don Ivo (1852-1933), priest, politician, member of the Dalmatian Assembly and the Imperial Council, editor of La Dalmazie cattolice and Hrvatska kruna, Zadar.

The holding consists of Ivo Prodan's personal documents, letters, manuscripts and printed matter. Part of his legacy (one box) is held by the National and University Library of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Material: incomplete, time frame: 1875-1927; 5 boxes of documents, well preserved, but unclassified and inaccessible; languages: the language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Italian; script: Latin.

209. Protić Jovan – Mostar – Sarajevo (Call no. O-JP-373)

Protić Jovan (1868-1926), Orthodox priest, writer, Mostar – Sarajevo.

The holding consists of 70 letters to Jovan Protić from other writers, including Milan Budisavljević, Pajo Marković, Branislav Nušić, Boro Stanković and Aleksa Šantić.

Material: incomplete, time frame: 1895-1926; one box of documents, well preserved, thematically classified and accessible; languages: the language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina; script: Cyrillic, Latin; with analytical inventory.

210. Radulovići – Sarajevo (Call no. O-R-230)

The Radulović merchant family of Sarajevo.

The holding consists of commercial correspondence shedding light on the way trade was conducted in this part of the world, with the names of the merchants and towns with which the Radulović family maintained contacts.

Material: fragmentary, time frame: 1832-1874; 2 boxes of documents; damaged, thematically classified and accessible; languages: the language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina; script: Cyrillic, Latin; with an incomplete analytical inventory.

211. Rašić Nikola – Sarajevo (Call no. O-RN-92)

Rašić Nikola, judge, of Sarajevo.

The holding consists of personal documents, letters and newspaper articles.

Material: fragmentary, time frame: 1905-1927; one box of documents, well preserved, classified and accessible; languages: the language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Latin, German; script: Latin; with an analytical inventory.

212. Sarajlić Šemsudin – Sarajevo (Call no. O-SŠ-252)

Sarajlić Šemsudin (1887-1960), writer, Sarajevo.

The holding consists of the manuscripts of short stories, novels and poems, official documents, diaries and correspondence between the Ćelić and Efica families.

Material: complete, time frame: 1908-1944; 9 boxes; well preserved, classified and accessible; languages: the language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Turkish, French, Arabic; script: Latin, arebica; with analytical inventory.

213. Spaho Fehim – Sarajevo (Call no. O-SF-36)

Spaho Fehim (1877-1942), reis-ul-ulema, Sarajevo.

The holding consists both of the personal holding of Fehim Spaho and of the official documentation of his office, mainly consisting of correspondence.

Material: complete, time frame: 1904-1942; 10 boxes, well preserved, classified and accessible; languages: the language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Arabic, German; script: Latin, Cyrillic, arebica; with analytical inventory.

214. Stefanovići – Sarajevo (Call no. O-S-386)

This small holding includes not only correspondence between the brothers Trifko and Todor Stefanović (about 20 letters, between Sarajevo and Dubrovnik), but also some letters of documents of various provenance, dating from 1836 top 1854, often badly damaged and unidentified, some in arebica script or in the Greek language.

Material: fragmentary, time frame: 1824-1834; one box of documents; damaged, unclassified and inaccessible; languages: the language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina; script: Cyrillic and Greek.

215. Šahinović Munir Ekremov – Sarajevo (Call no. O-ŠM-130)

Šahinović Munir Ekremov, journalist, writer, editor of Muslimanska svijest, director of the Publicity Office for BiH, Sarajevo.

The holding consists of manuscripts, correspondence, various newspaper articles and some private documents and notes.

Material: incomplete, time frame: 1929-1944; one box of documents, well preserved, thematically classified and accessible; languages: the language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina, German; script: Latin; with analytical inventory.

216. Šnajder Dr. Marcel and Šnajder-Popović Dr. Vera – Sarajevo (Call no. O-MVŠ-384)

Šnajder Dr. Marcel and Dr. Vera, teachers and doctors, Sarajevo.

The holding consists of personal documents, correspondence, articles and notes, and photographs of Dr Marcel and Dr Vera Šnajder.

Material: incomplete, time frame: 1921-1986; 3 boxes of documents, well preserved, classified and accessible; languages: the language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina, French, German; script: Latin, Cyrillic; with a summary inventory.

217. Tasovac Jovan – Sarajevo (Call no. O-T-387)

Tasovac Jovan, merchant, of Sarajevo.

The holding consists of correspondence with merchants in Trieste, Vienna, Pest, Samokov, Ušćup, Prijepolje, Split, Metković, Trebinje, Bugojno, Banja Luka, Gradiška, Slavonski Brod, Bosanski Šamac, Tešanj and Mostar.

Material: fragmentary, time frame: 1860-1874; one box of documents, damaged, unclassified and inaccessible; languages: the language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Italian; script: Cyrillic, Latin.

218. Todorovići – Sarajevo (Call no. O-T-371)

The Todorović merchant family of Sarajevo.

Though very limited in extent, this holding of the merchant and land-owning Todorović family, originally from Čajniče and later living in Sarajevo, provides interesting information on relations between land-owners, serfs and leaseholders in the Sarajevo region in the late 19th century.

Material: fragmentary, time frame: 1887-1900; 2 volumes, partly preserved, thematically classified and accessible; languages: the language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina; script: Cyrillic.

219. Travanj Kosta – Sarajevo (Call no. O-TK-16)

Travanj Kosta (1868-1950), music teacher and choir leader, Sarajevo.

The holding consists of writings on music, sheet music and partitions.

Material: fragmentary; time frame: 1888-1949; 2 boxes of documents, well preserved, thematically classified and accessible; languages: the language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina; script: Latin.

220. Velc Ferdinand – Sarajevo (Call no. O-FV-374)

Velc Ferdinand (1864-1920), teacher, artist, Sarajevo.

The holding, consisting of about 5,000 sheets with hand-written bibliographical details on Bosnia and Herzegovina, collected by Ferdinand Velc and his associates at the instigation of Karl Patsch, director of the Institute of Balkan Studies in Sarajevo, was acquired from Sarajevo City Council when the Institute closed down. In acquiring the holding of Sarajevo City Hall, the Archive also came into the possession of this holding. The material was assembled for a bibliography of Bosnia and Herzegovina from 1488 to 1918.

Material: incomplete, time frame: 1844-1918; 3 boxes of documents, well preserved, partly classified on the registry principle and accessible; languages: the language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina, German, Czech, Polish, French, English, Italian, Hungarian, Latin, Old Slavic; script: Latin, Gothic, Cyrillic.

221. Žiga Mahmut – Sarajevo (Call no. O-ŽM-48)

Žiga Mahmut (1886-1960), land-owner, chairman of Ilidža Council.

The holding consists of title deeds, letters to his family during World War I, and the archive of the Butmir Cattle-Farmers' Cooperative (1931-1942).

Material: fragmentary, time frame: 1900-1942; 3 boxes of volumes and documents, well preserved, thematically classified and accessible; languages: the language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina; script: Latin.

 

COLLECTIONS

222. Posters (Call no. ZP-573)

The collection of posters was formed by purchase and gift from private individuals and institutions and includes posters acquired with the Archive's various holdings. The collection was formed by City Hall and the Government Commissioner for Sarajevo, the Svjetlost publishing house of Sarajevo, various institutions and printing houses, socio-political organizations etc. The material relates to a range of fields: the administration, politics, the military, the police, finance, culture, education, art, sport, public utilities, commerce, etc.

The collection covers the period from 1878 to 2004 and consists of 3,027 posters (with another thousand or so duplicates). It is well preserved, chronologically classified and accessible; languages: the language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina, German, Italian; script: Latin, Cyrillic, Gothic; with card index and inventory.

223. Photographs (Call no. ZF-574)

The collection of photographs was formed by gift and purchase from private individuals, institutions and organizations, and includes photographs acquired with the Archive's various holdings. It is still being added to as further holdings are classified.

Material: time frame 1878-1970; 19 albums (920 photographs), series and individual photographs, 2,490 photocopies and postcards, 157 photographic plates, 122 unidentified photographs. The material is well preserved, classified by provenance, thematically and chronologically, accessible, and catalogued.

224. Maps and Plans (Call no. ZKP-575)

The collection was formed by purchase, gift and acquisition from institutions and individuals, and includes material selected from various other holdings in the Historical Archive during classification.

The collection includes a number of unique items, 18th-century hand-drawn maps of the countries of the Balkans and the Adriatic coast of western provenance.

Material: time frame: 1745-1979; 11 boxes with 513 geographical, political and other special maps, 332 military maps, sketches and plans, 39 city plans, 7 atlases and 60 technical plans and drawings; well preserved, classified chronologically, accessible; languages: the language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina, German, Latin, Italian, Hungarian, Russian, French, English; script: Latin, Cyrillic, Gothic; with card index for one period, and with summary-analytical inventory.

225. Varia (Call no. ZV-576)

The collection was formed by gift and purchase from various owners and from material in other holdings in the Archive. It includes documents from the Ottoman, Austro-Hungarian and inter-war periods, and from the Independent State of Croatia and the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (Democratic Federal Yugoslavia, Federal People's Republic of Yugoslavia). Until 1969 it was known as the Collection of Gifts and Purchases. In addition to unrelated documents of different provenance, it also included small groups, parts of some small holdings, which have been separated out from the Collection.

Material: time frame: 1829-1963; 25 boxes, 674 inventory units; well preserved, classified thematically and by accession date, accessible; languages: the language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina, German, Slovenian, French, English, Arabic, Turkish, Hebrew, Latin, Church Slavonic, Italian, Hungarian, Polish, Bulgarian, Czech; script: Cyrillic, Latin, Gothic, Hebrew and Arabic; with thematic card index and card index in order of accession, and with an inventory.

226. Reproductions and Drawings (Call no. ZRC-577)

The collection was formed by purchase from individuals and institutions and from reproductions and drawings in other holdings and collections in the Archive. The reproductions, which are of printed illustrations, and the drawings, date from the Austro-Hungarian period, the Kingdom of Yugoslavia and the Federal People's Republic of Yugoslavia.

Material: time frame: 1894-1961; 8 portfolios or albums with a total of 177 reproductions and drawings, 331 separate reproductions of printed drawings and illustrations; partly preserved; classified by provenance and accessible; languages: the language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina, German; script: Latin, Cyrillic; with a summary inventory.

227. Postmarks and Postage Stamps (Sign PŽM-154)

The collection was formed by purchasing postmarks and postage stamps from a private collector, Vjekoslav Trbarić, of Sarajevo. The collection dates from the Ottoman period to 1961, and consists of letters, postal orders, postcards and seals used in Bosnia and Herzegovina during the occupation, the War of National Liberation of 1941-1945, and the early post-World War II years.

Material: time frame: 1878-1961; 5 groups, 9 kinds, 251 sheets, 680 items, 1 portfolio, 1 legend, and 7 groups of postmarks and letters (envelopes), consignments, postcards and stamps; well preserved, classified thematically on the registry principle, accessible; languages: the language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina, German, Turkish; script: Latin, Cyrillic, arebica; with analytical inventory.

228. Stereotypes (Call no. ZK-578)

The collection of stereotypes was formed by purchase and gift from private individuals and institutions and from items in some of the holdings of the Historical Archive. The Archive's various moves to different premises, and the unsuitable conditions where its holdings have been housed, mean that this Collection has not been properly treated, and the description of its state of preservation, classification and accessibility, and even the stated number of stereotypes, must be regarded as tentative.

Material: time frame: first half of the 20th century; 1,081 stereotypes of various provenance, partly preserved, partly classified and accessible; languages: the language of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Turkish, Arabic; script: Latin, arebica, Cyrillic; with inventory.

 

LIST OF PERIODICALS AND MONOGRAPHS – RARITIES FROM THE SPECIAL LIBRARY

PERIODICALS

1. Jukić, Ivan Frano. Bosanski prijatelj: časopis saderžavajući potrebite korisne i zabavne stvari, yr. 1, vol. 1, Troškom Dr. Ljudevita Gaja, Zagreb, 1850.

2. Jukić, Ivan Frano. Bosanski prijatelj: časopis saderžavajući potrebite korisne i zabavne stvari, yr. 2, vol. 2, Troškom Dr. Ljudevita Gaja, Zagreb, 1851.

3. Jukić, Ivan Frano. Bosanski prijatelj: časopis saderžavajući potrebite korisne i zabavne stvari, yr. 3, vol. 3, Troškom Matice ilirske, Zagreb, 1861.

4. Jukić, Ivan Frano. Bosanski prijatelj: časopis saderžavajući potrebite korisne i zabavne stvari, yr. 4, vol. 4, Knjižara Svetozara Galca, Zagreb, 1870.

5. Bosnia: Official Gazette of the Bosnian Vilayet, yr. 3, no. 106 (10/22. 6. 1868).

6. Prvi bosansko-srpski kalendar za prostu godinu 1869, Bosnian Vilayet Press, 1869.

7. Miličević, Franjo. Mali stoljetnjak ili koledar za sto godinah u tri diela složen, Mostar, 1878.

8. Mladi Hercegovac ili koledar hercegovački novi i stari za prestupnu godinu 1884, Mostar, 1883.

9. Kalendarium romano-seraphicum, Sarajevo, 1896.

10. Hrvatski narodni kalendar fra Grga Martić za 1908, Zaklada fra Grge Martića, Sarajevo, 1908.

11. Gaj, Velimir. Balkan – divan, viesti, misli i prouke o zemlji i narodu na vlast u Bosni i Hercegovini, Zagreb, 1878.

12. Dalmatinsko-srpski magazin, Zadar, 1873.

MONOGRAPHS

1. Bukvar za osnovne škole u Vilajetu bosanskom, Bosnian Vilayet Press, Sarajevo, 1867

2. Prva čitanka u Vilajetu bosanskom za osnovne škole, Bosnian Vilayet Press, Sarajevo, 1868.

3. Kratka sveštena historija za osnovne škole u Vilajetu bosanskom, Sarajevo, 1868.

4. Carski kazneni zakonik za Bosanski vilajet, Vilayet Press in Sarajevo, 1870.

5. Zemljopis za treći razred osnovnih škola u BiH, Provincial Government for BiH, Sarajevo, 1885.

6. Nauk krstjanski za katoličke pučke učione, Mostar, 1874.

7. Miličević, Franjo. Skladnja (sinteza) ili druga strana slovnice talijanske, Mostar, 1878.

8. Martić, Grga; Ivan Frano Jukić. Bosanska pjesmarica: ili Junačka djela naših djedova opjevana od horna naroda, Knjižara L. Hartman Press, Zagreb.

9. Zemljopis i poviestnica Bosne od Slavoljuba Bošnjaka (Ivana Frane Jukića), Zagreb 1851.

10. Jukić, Ivan Frano. Narodne pjesme bosanske i hercegovačke junačke pjesme, Vol. 1, Mostar, 1892.

11. Jukić, Ivan Frano; Ljubomir Hercegovac. Narodne piesme bosanske i hercegovačke piesme, Vol. 1, Part 1, publ. Filip Kunić, Osijek, 1858.

12. Petranović, Bogoljub. Srpske narodne pjesme iz Bosne (ženske), book one, Sarajevo, 1867.

13. Petranović, Bogoljub. Srpske narodne pjesme iz Bosne i Hercegovine, book three, Belgrade, 1870.

14. Šantić, Aleksa. Pjesme, book two, Mostar, 1895.

15. Giljferding Fedorović, Aleksandar. Bosna (iz putovanja po Bosni), publ. Milan Đ. Miličević, Belgrade, 1859.

16. Vrčević, Vitez Vuk. Hercegovačke narodne pjesme, knjižara D. Pretnera, Dubrovnik, 1890.

17. Kovačević, Tomo. Opis Bosne i Hercegovine. Belgrade, 1879.

18. Rajić, Jovan. Kratae Serbaji, Rassji, Bosni i Ram i Kralevstv istorija, Vienna, 1793.

19. Rajić, Jovan. Istorija raznih slavenskih narodov najpače Bolgar, Horvatov i Serbov, Vienna, 1794.

20. Knežević, Antun. Kratka povjest kralja Bosnianh, sv. 1, knjižara Dragutina Pretnera, Dubrovnik 1884.

21. Knežević, Antun. Kratka povjest kralja Bosnianh, sv. 3, knjižara Dragutina Pretnera, Dubrovnik, 1887.

22. Nedić Tolišanin, Martin. Stanje redodržave Bosne Srebrene poslije pada kraljevstva bosanskog pak do okupacije u četiri vieka, Đakovo, 1884.

23. Nedić, Martin. Poraz bašah – a zavedenje nizama u Bosni, Pečuh, 1884.

24. Klaić, Vjekoslav. Bosnensija, Zagreb, 1879.

25. Bogović, Mirko. Stepan poslednji kralj Bosnian – drama u pet činah, tiskarnica Dr. Ljudevita Gaja, Zagreb, 1857.

26. Milutinović Sarajlija, Simeon. Zorica, Budim, 1827.

27. Milutinović Sarajlija, Sima. Istorija Cerne Gore od iskona do novieg vremena, Belgrade, 1835.

28. Milutinović Sarajlija, Sima. Troebratstvo to est rod, put i naad muža, Belgrade, 1844.

29. Milutinović Sarajlija, Simeon. Tragedija Obilića, Leipzig, 1857.

30. Kraljević, Angel. Razgovori duhovni s pripravom osobitom, za uprav ispoviditi se i dostojno pričestiti se, Rome, 1860.

31. Kraljević, Angeo. Grammatica latino-illyrica, Rome, 1863.

32. Milletich, Augustin. Početak slovstva i kratko istomacegne stvarii potrebitii nauka karistianskoga, Split, 1815.

33. Milletich, Augustin Naredbe i uprave biskupa namistnika aposctolski proshasti i sadascgnega, Split, 1818.

34. Milletich, Augustin. Naredbe i uprave biskupa namistnika aposctolski proshasti i sadascgnega, Rome, 1828.

35. Miletić, Augustin. Istomačenje stvarih potrebitih nauka krstjanskoga, Rome, 1867.

36. Specilegium observationum historicogeographicarum de Bosniae regno hungarici quondam juris. Occasione armorum caesareorum hoc ano MDCCXXXVII in Bosniam motorum. Štampana 1737. u štampariji Buartsi.

37. Maximilian Schimek's Politische Geschichte des Königreichs Bosnien und Rama von Jahre 867. bis 1741, Vienna, 1787.

38. Marianovich P., Stephani. Bosnae argentinae, pro classe prima, Split, 1822.

39. Bakula, Pietro. I martirii nella missione franciscana osservante in Erzegovina, Rome, 1862.

40. Bakula, Petar. Politika za svakog čovika, dio prvi. Split, 1869.

41. Drobnić, Josip. Ilirsko-nemačko-talijanski mali rečnik, Matica ilirska in Vienna, 1846/1849.

42. Filipović, Jerolim. Pripovidanje nauka krstjanskoga, vol. 2, u Maltezi, 1759.

43. Filipović, Jerolim. Pripovidanje nauka krstjanskoga, vol. 3, u Maltezi, 1765

44. Đurđević, Bartol. Opera nova che com prende quatro liretti, Rome, 1555.

45. Biro de Padany Vesprimski Biskup, Martin. Dussu osuvaiuche pohogjenje u iezik illiricski, preveo fra Ierolymu Lipovcsichu, Buda, 1750.

46. Kvaternik, Eugen. Das Historisch – Diplomatische Verhaltniss des Königreichs Kroatien zu der Ungarischen St. Stephans-Krone (zweite revidierte und vermehrte Auflage), Agram, 1861.

47. New Testament, trans. Vuk Stefanović Karadžić, Berlin, 1857.

48. Karadžić Stefanović, Vuk. Deutsch = Serbisches Worterbuch, Wienna, 1872.

49. Čoslov, Blagosloveniem že preosveštenneišh, serpsko-pravoslavnih arhiepiskov mitropolitev dabro-bosnijskago: gospodin Nikolaa Mandića, Sarajevo, 1902.

50. Solarič, Pavle. Novo graždansko zemlopisanie pervo na eziku serbskom, Venice, 1804.

51. Branković, Avram. Karakteristika ili opisanie naroda po celoi zemlji živećeg iz verodostoni pisanija, Buda, 1827.

52. Rakić, Vićentije. Istoria o razorenij poslednem svjatoga grada Jerusalima i vzjati Konstantinopolja, Venice, 1804.

53. Kondžulić, Todor. Pisma razny rodova, Zemun, 1853.

54. Magarašević, Georgije. Istorija najvažniji politični evropejski priključenija ot Vienskoga mira 1809. do 1821. godine, Vienna, 1823.

55. Magarašević, Georgije. Kratka vsemirna istoria ot Georgija Magaraševića profesora, Buda, 1831.

56. Mihajlović, Evstafija. Osveta i sudbina ili Dragomir Župan Trebinski, Buda, 1833.

57. Heinrich, Jack Joachim. Der wichtigsten und interessantesten Reisen in die Turkey, Graz, 1831.

58. Ranke, Leopold. Die Serbischen Revolution aus Serbischen Papieren und Mitthlungen von Leopold Ranke, Hamburg, 1829.

59. Die Freiwillige Theilnahme der Serbe und Kroaten an der vir letzen Österreichisch – Turkischen Kriegen, Vienna, 1854.

60. Le grand dictionnaire historique, tome premier A – B, Amsterdam, 1702.

61. Le grand dictionaire historique, tome troisieme, G – M, Amsterdam, 1702.

62. Moreri, Louis. Du grand dictionaire historique, tome premier A – H, Amsterdam, 1716.

63. Bordeaux, Albert. La Bosnie populaire, paysages – moeurs et coutumes, legendes – chants populaires-mines, Paris, 1904.

64. Dauzet, Pierre. Gloria da la guerre 1914 – 1918, Paris, 1920.

65. Sansovino, Francesco. Sansovino del governo, Venice, 1559.

66. De Servi Fiorentino, Ferdinando. Historie generali de Tvrchi, Venice, 1657.

67. Blaskovich de Blaskovcz, Andreae. Historia universalis illyrici, Vols I – V, Zagrebiae, 1744.

68. Thora – Erlaubnise der Cenzur 1871.

The evolution of language(s) in Bosnia and Herzegovina

The modern standardized languages spoken by the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina are the result of a long and complex process of evolution, often reflecting historical or political developments.(13)  

General criteria and periodizations are usually applied to an overall or partial study, analysis and presentation of the development of standard language and linguistic policy in Bosnia and Herzegovina. The question of standard language is associated with various historical periods, determined primarily by the legal status of Bosnia and Herzegovina in international law and the nature of the ruling regime (foreign or domestic). The normal periodization is thus as follows:

1. Turkish period (do 1878)

2. Austro-Hungarian period (1878-1918)

3. Inter-war period or period of the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes, later Yugoslavia (1918-1941)

4. World War II or the period of the Independent State of Croatia (1941-1945)

5. Post-war period or the period of the second, socialist Yugoslavia (1945-1990)

6. Modern period, since the dissolution of the federal Yugoslav state and the formation of new states (since 1990).

By comparison with the other countries of the central-south Slav region, the tradition of the literary language of Bosnia and Herzegovina is extraordinarily uniform, its literary language, based on the spoken language, evolving in unbroken continuity ever since Kulin ban’s Charter of 1189.

The language of mediaeval Bosnia and Herzegovina is known to us from surviving written sources. These are texts that came into being on the frontiers of the mediaeval Bosnian state between the 12th and the 15th century. Mediaeval Bosnian literacy/literature evolved in particular political and highly specific religious and ecclesiastical circumstances. The books of this period in the Slav world were intended mainly for religious purposes and for use by the church.

Apart from Latin, two literary languages were in use in mediaeval Bosnia and Herzegovina: a redaction of Old Slavonic, and the vernacular. Old Slavonic, which was a purely written language, never a spoken one, was reserved in principle for religious, and above all for liturgical texts, while secular literature, both translated and original, was mainly composed in the vernacular idiom.

The script used for the majority of texts in Hum/Herzegovina and Bosnia dating from the Middle Ages, 12th to 15th century, was Cyrillic. The first Slavonic script used here was probably Glagolitic, but little evidence of it remains.

When the Ottomans came to what is now Bosnia and Herzegovina, they encountered an alien, Slavonic language, the vernacular languages of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina, subdivided into dialects – Štokavian-Šćakavian, mainly Ikavian. The population was divided by religion into three forms of Christianity: the Orthodox, Catholic, and krstjan churches, though the latter was already in decline or had almost disappeared. After the Islamization that soon followed, the population would be, and remains, differentiated on the basis of three religions, this time Orthodoxy, Catholicism and Islam. This would impact on the choice of script as a feature of religious, and later of national, identity.

Clearly, the language did not stand still during the long Turkish period (1463-1878). To the contrary, it went through several phases of evolution; but regardless of the inferior socio-political status of the local population, it would seem that the language was never under external threat during the Turkish period.

Other languages also came into use: Turkish, Persian and Arabic. Texts began to appear in the vernacular but written in the Arabic script, belonging to the literature known as alhamijado [aljamiado].

Between 1463 and 1878, the Croatian standard linguistic tradition was associated almost exclusively with the work of the Franciscans of Bosnia Argentina. Their writings covered a very wide range of issues, and thus vary considerably, being written in the Bosanica (Bosančica) [Bosnian Cyrillic] or Latin scripts. Franciscan writers had various names for their idiom – Slovinian, the languages of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina, “our language,” Illyrian, the Slavic languages of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Dumanian and Croatian.

The standard linguistic usage largely shaped in Bosnia and Herzegovina, but also in Croatia, by the Franciscans of Bosnia Argentina had a major impact on the (ultimate) standardization and codification of Croatian in the late 19th century, and also affected the way in which other idioms of standard linguistic type based on the Štokavian vernacular were shaped.

The languages of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina and the Herzegovina Serbs inherited two linguistic expressions from the Nemanja era – Serbo-Slavonic and the vernacular – and the Cyrillic script, which differed functionally. The first was used for ecclesiastical purposes, the second for secular writings. Russian influences, and with them Russian Church Slavonic, entered the scene in the latter half of the 18th century, affecting Serbo-Slavonic. In the latter half of the 19th century, however, the graphic and linguistic reforms of Vuk Stefanović Karadžić were adopted, and the East Herzegovina dialect was elevated to the rank of a literary language. The adoption of Vuk’s reformed Cyrillic, phonological orthography and Vuk-type literary language in Bosnia and Herzegovina was completed in 1966.

During the Austro-Hungarian period, too, Bosnia and Herzegovina was a multilingual country. During the disputes between leading religio-nationalist activities and the political squabbles over whether the Monarchy was to be remodelled along ethnic and territorial lines into a federation, Benjamin Kállay was averse to every manifestation of separatist national aspirations by the population, hoping to turn Bosnia and Herzegovina into an organized colony and, by administrative means, to create a Bosnian nationality and a single Bosnian language from the languages of its people.

The period from 1880 to 1918 was marked by a number of changes in the name given to the language:

-       up to 1880, the language of public communication was officially known as Croatian, which was not to the liking of part of the population. The order was therefore given to call it the zemaljski jezik(14)  

-       in 1890 the official name of the language of the province became “the languages of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina” (with a distinctive Bosnian grammar). The name zemaljski jezik remained in use in Government documents and interconfessional schools, along with “the languages of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina(15) and other names: the Bosniac language, Serbian or Croatian, and Croatian or Serbian

-       in 1895 the Serbian church school board in Tuzla suggested that the language of Bosnia and Herzegovina officially be called the languages of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina-Serbian. During Kállay’s regime there was also the isolated use of the name Croatian-languages of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina

-       from 1903 on, with the growing tendency to express national Croatian and Serbian identity with the labels Serbian, Croatian or Serbo-Croatian in the titles of various associations, institutions, documents etc., the name of the languages of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina increasingly came to be known in public communication by the name Serbo-Croatian

-       in 1908 Vuletić’s Gramatika bosanskog jezika was given a new title by government order, becoming the Gramatika srpsko-hrvatskog jezika

-       in 1913 the name Serbo-Croatian was legally approved as the official language and teaching medium of Bosnia and Herzegovina

-       in 1915 Cyrillic was abolished

-       in 1918 the National Council of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes for Bosnia and Herzegovina declared that the official language in Bosnia and Herzegovina was Serbian or Croatian.

Under the centralized polity of the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes (later, from 1929, the Kingdom of Yugoslavia), all legislative acts emerged from the centre of the state, Belgrade, including those pertaining to language.

The first Constitution of the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes, adopted on 28 June 1921, included a provision that the official language (and its name) of the Kingdom was Serbo-Croato-Slovenian. The same formulation was also used in the second Constitution of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia, passed on 3 September 1931.

Following the capitulation and collapse of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia in the short-lived war of April 1941, the Independent State of Croatia (NDH) was established, which included the whole of Bosnia and Herzegovina. The NDH was divided into large counties with no jurisdiction over legislation or education; all laws, including those governing language, were passed in Zagreb, and applied throughout the NDH, including Bosnia and Herzegovina.

The official name of the language of the NDH was Croatian (“the pure Croatian language”), and a special law was passed forbidding the use of the Cyrillic script (Executive Order of the Ministry of the Interior banning the use of Cyrillic).

During the post-war period, from 1945 through to 1970, a number of congresses of Yugoslavists were held, and the first signs of Serbo-Croatian linguistic clashes were seen.

From 1945 to the mid 1950s (in fact, to the Novi Sad agreement of 1954), the main national subject in the schools of Bosnia and Herzegovina was “Serbian or Croatian,” as it was known in the 1946 Constitution of the Peoples’ Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina (published in early 1947). From 1954/55 to 1960, when the common orthography was published, the semi-compound Serbo-Croatian was used, later replaced by the compound Serbocroatian (as in the 1963 Constitution of Bosnia and Herzegovina. It was only in the later 1960s, presumably under the influence of the first documents on linguistic policy in Bosnia and Herzegovina, that the name “Serbocroatian-Croatoserbian language” became the established usage. From the 1950s on, the Latin script increasingly came to dominate in the education system.

Following the dissolution of Yugoslavia in 1991 and the first half of 1992, the new states that emerged began to implement their own independent cultural and linguistic policies. The name “Serbocroatian” was no longer used in the neighbouring states.(16)  

Single-term names were rapidly legalized, beginning with the 1992 Constitution of Republika Srpska, where the relevant clause reads:

In the Republic, the Serbian language in the Ijekavian and Ekavian form and the Cyrillic script are in official use, while the Latin script is used as prescribed by law (Official Gazette of Republika Srpska no. 3/92).

The corresponding clause in the 1994 Constitution of the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina reads:

The official languages of the Federation are the languages of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina and the Croatian language. The official script is the Latin script. Other languages may be used as a means of communication and for teaching purposes (Official Gazette of the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina, 21 July 1994).

The 1998 constitutions reaffirm the same status for the language(s). However, on 19 August 2000, following length discussion, the Constitutional Court of Bosnia and Herzegovina declared that these provisions were unconstitutional. In 2002 the then High Representative, Wolfgang Petritsch, issued a decision amending the constitutions of the two entities, with the intention of strengthening linguistic equality.

The amendment to the Constitution of the Federation reads:

The official languages of the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina are the languages of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatian and Serbian (Amendment XXIX, 19 April 2002).

The amendment to the Constitution of Republika Srpska reads:

The official languages of Republika Srpska are the language of the Serbian people, the language of the Bosniac people and the language of the Croatian people (Amendment LXXI, 19 April 2002).

 

3. Legal status to date

The Historical Archive of Sarajevo has not so far enjoyed protected status.

 

4. Current condition of the property

The archive material of the Historical Archive of Sarajevo is housed at no. 19 Alipašina St., no. 90 Čadordžina St. (store), and no. 13 Ferhadija St. (store). The collections and holdings are largely well preserved, though somewhat neglected and damaged as a result of the poor conditions in which the archive material has been housed.

In 2008 the Archive's management applied to the Government of Sarajevo Canton for funds to carry out a project (planned for 2008-2010) for remedial works on the gallery space of the Historical Archive of Sarajevo. The Government approved funds for the part of the project relating to remedial works and adaptation of the storage space, as a result of which optimal conditions for the safekeeping, protection, processing and use of the archive material have been created.

 

III – CONCLUSION

Applying the Criteria for the adoption of a decision on proclaiming an item of property a national monument (Official Gazette of BiH nos. 33/02 and 15/03), the Commission has enacted the Decision cited above.

The Decision was based on the following criteria:

A.         Time frame

B.         Historical value

C.         Artistic and aesthetic value

C.i.       quality of workmanship

C.ii.      quality of material

C.iv.     composition

C.v.      value of details

D.         Clarity (documentary, scientific and educational value)

D.i.       material evidence of a lesser known historical era

D.ii.      evidence of historical change

D.iv.     evidence of a typical way of life at a specific period

E.         Symbolic value

E.v.      significance for the identity of a group of people

G.         Authenticity

G.i.       material and content

G.iii.     use and function

G.vi.     spirit and feeling

G.vii.    other internal and external factors

I.          Completeness

I.ii.        physical coherence

I.iii.       completeness

 

The following documents form an integral part of this Decision:

-       photo documentation of the Historical Archive, Sarajevo (10 February 2009)

-       photographs of the property taken on 12 June 2009 by Aleksandra Bunin, art historian, using Canon SX10 IS digital camera.

 

Bibliography

During the procedure to designate the collections and holdings of the Historical Archive, Sarajevo, as a national monument of Bosnia and Herzegovina the following works were consulted:

 

1981.    Arhivski fondovi i zbirke u SFRJ – SR Bosna i Hercegovina (Archive Holdings and Collections in SFRY – SR Bosnia and Herzegovina). Belgrade: Federated Societies of Archive Workers of Yugoslavia, 1981.

 

2003.    Vodič kroz fondove i zbirke Istorijskog arhiva Sarajevo (Guide to the Holdings and Collections of the Historical Archive). Sarajevo: Historical Archive, 2003.

 

2008.    Istorijski arhiv Sarajevo 1948 – 2008 Priča o nama (The Historical Archive of Sarajevo 1948-2008 – Our Story). Sarajevo: Historical Archive, 2008.


(1) For an account of the development of language(s) in Bosnia and Herzegovina see below, item 2 of the Elucidation (Description of the property), Development of language(s) in Bosnia and Herzegovina

(2) Translator’s note: though the word “orient” originally referred in English usage to what is now known as the Middle East, its connotations have shifted steadily eastwards, and it now denotes the Far East. The term “oriental” has also become overshadowed by often negative connotations since the publication of Edward Said’s seminal, if controversial, work Orientalism. However, the older usage is retained in the Balkans, as suggested by the languages of the books and manuscripts in the collection: Turkish, Arabic and Persian. With this caveat, the older use is also retained in the translation of this and other decisions of the Commission to Preserve National Monuments.

(3) Translator’s note: a čifluk (Tur. çiflik) was a form of feudal landholding first introduced in the Ottoman Empire in the 17th century and in Bosnia and Herzegovina at the turn of the 17th/18th century, and representing “a specific form of dispossession of the peasants and the concomitant creation of large estates in the hands of the landlords.” (Mustafa Imamović, Bosnia and Herzegovina:  Evolution of its Political and Legal Institutions, trans. Saba Risaluddin, Magistrat, Sarajevo, 2006, 137.)

(4) Translator’s note: in the original the phrase here translated as “local authors” literally reads “our people.”

(5) Translator’s note: alhamijado is the Bosnian spelling of the term aljamiado, used to denote the use of the Arabic script for transcribing languages such as Mozarabic or Ladino in al-Andalus. Alhamijado thus applies to the use of the Arabic script for transcribing Bosnian.

(6) For details see Decision of the Commission to Preserve National Monuments designating the townscape ensemble of the Hajji Sinan (Silahdar Mustafa pasha) tekke with Sarač Alija Mosque and the graveyard alongside it in Sarajevo as a national monument of Bosnia and Herzegovina (no. 09-2-63/05-7 of 16 March 2005)

(7) Translator’s note: in case this paragraph is not clear, I append a brief excerpt from Mustafa Imamović, op.cit., 201: “4. The judiciary. As with the administration, so too in the judiciary the Ottoman organization was retained. The lowest courts were the county courts, of which there were forty-eight. The six district courts exercised appellate powers. On 7 July 1879, the country’s Supreme Court (Landesgericht) began operating in Sarajevo. 

Alongside all the county courts there were also shari’a courts dealing with family and inheritance law for the Muslim population. The Supreme Court in Sarajevo had its associated Court of Appeal and Cassation, the Supreme Shari’a Court (Scheriatsobergericht). The district courts also acted as commercial courts.”

(8) Translator’s note: the terminology used by the various administrations in Bosnia and Herzegovina poses problems for the hapless translator. The administrative entities known as kaza under the Ottomans, usually rendered as srez, were turned into kotars, or counties, under the Austro-Hungarians. Bujić gives two alternatives for the word kotar: “county” and “district.” Turn to srez in the dictionary and you find “see kotar.” In Morton Benson, srez is translated as “(administrative) district (in certain parts of Yugo.; see also kotar.” The translation given for kotar in Morton Benson is exactly the same as that for srez. Okrug (adj. okružni) is rendered as “district” by both Bujić and Morton Benson. Further research turned up the following: “The Landesregierung [central Provincial Government in Sarajevo] then set up six regional offices (Kreis) throughout Bosnia-Herzegovina in the towns of Mostar, Sarajevo, Travnik, Banja Luka, Bihać, and Tuzla. Those regions were further divided into districts (Bezirk) and even further into sub-districts (Expositur).” http://www.irex.org/programs/iaro/research/06-07/Glocke.pdf. Both Kreis and Bezirk are given in an on-line Serbo-Croatian dictionary as translations of the word srez. 

(9)  Kaiserlich und Königlich = imperial and royal

(10) Translator’s note: the word “public” as the translation of narodna is used here not in the British sense, to denote an exclusive, independent fee-paying school, but in the general dictionary sense of “opposite of private,” “of or relating to the people.” The term “state school” is avoided even where the term državna (national or state) appears in the name of the school, both because of its specific meaning in (UK) English and because Bosnia and Herzegovina’s status varied at different times – a corpus separatum with a Provincial Government during the Austro-Hungarian period, then part of the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes/Kingdom of Yugoslavia, part of the so-called Independent State of Croatia during World War II, and then an autonomous Republic in the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia. With this caveat, the names of the schools are translated literally. I use the (UK) English term “grammar school” rather than “high school” for gimnazija.

(11) Translator’s note: the number of these schools is as given, missing 10th and with 12th repeated twice. The call numbers make it clear that these are different holdings.

(12) Translator’s note: Miss Irby travelled widely in the Balkans with Georgina MacKenzie, with whom she wrote a book entitled Travels in the Slavonic Provinces of Turkey-in-Europe. They arrived in Sarajevo in the 1860s and, with the intention of enlightening the local Christian populations, founded a school for Orthodox girls there in 1869. Mis Irbina street in Sarajevo is named after her.

(13) The following passage is taken from Svein Mønnesland (ed.), Jezik u Bosni I Hercegovini, Sarajevo-Oslo, Institut za jezik – Department for East  European and Oriental Studies, 2005

(14) Translator’s note: This might be translated as the “provincial language” or “language of the province,” by analogy with Zemaljska vlada, the Provincial Government.

(15) Translator’s note: In the original this phrase, which appears several times, in fact reads, in literal translation, “the languages of the peoples of Bosnia and Herzegovina language.” 

(16) In Croatia, where the name “Croatian literary language” was officially recognized in the 1974 Constitution, “Croatian” became the official name in the 1990 Constitution. In Serbia, the name “Serbian language” was introduced in the 1991 Law on the Official Use of Languages and Scripts, with the same provision featuring in the 1992 constitutions of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia and the Republic of Montenegro. The same single-term names became the norm among the Croats and Serbs of Bosnia and Herzegovina. Among the Bosniacs, there were calls for a separate language for the Bosniacs, mainly wanting it to be called Bosnian.



Historical archives - present state of the storeroom in Čadordžina streetCollection of posters - Olympic Games in 1984 Collection of manuscripts - Small Qur\'an in silver box, Sign-OZ-R-144 Collection of manuscripts - Qur\'an from 1759, Sign-OZ-R-593
Silsilename (sequence of dervish orders through history)   


BiH jezici 
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