home    
 
Decisions on Designation of Properties as National Monuments

Provisional List

About the Provisional List

List of Petitions for Designation of Properties as National Monuments

Heritage at Risk

60th session - Decisions

Kuršumlija (Hajji Bali Bey’s) mosque, the architectural ensemble

gallery back

Status of monument -> National monument

Pursuant to Article V para. 4 Annex 8 of the General Framework Agreement for Peace in Bosnia and Herzegovina and Article 39 para. 1 of the Rules of Procedure of the Commission to Preserve National Monuments, at a session held from 15 to 21 March 2005, the Commission adopted a

 

D E C I S I O N

 

I

 

The architectural ensemble of the Kuršumlija (Hajji Bali Bey) Mosque in Kladanj is hereby designated as a National Monument of Bosnia and Herzegovina (hereinafter: the National Monument).

The National Monument consists of a mosque with Hajji Đurđuhanuma's fountain, surrounded by a wall and a graveyard.

The National Monument is located on a site designated as c.p. 4035 (new survey), entered Land Register entry No. 724, c.m. Kladanj,  Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bosnia and Herzegovina.

The provisions relating to protection measures set forth by the Law on the Implementation of the Decisions of the Commission to Preserve National Monuments, established pursuant to Annex 8 of the General Framework Agreement for Peace in Bosnia and Herzegovina (Official Gazette of the Federation of BiH”, Nos. 2/02, 27/02 and 6/04).

 

II

 

The Government of the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina (hereinafter: the Government of the Federation) shall be duty bound to ensure and provide the legal, scientific, technical, administrative and financial measures necessary to protect, conserve, display and rehabilitate the National Monument.

The Commission to Preserve National Monuments of Bosnia and Herzegovina (hereinafter: the Commission) shall determine the technical requirements and secure the funds for preparing and setting up signboards with the basic data on the monument and the Decision to proclaim the property a National Monument.

 

III

 

In order to ensure the on-going protection of the National Monument, the following measures are hereby stipulated, which shall apply to the site defined in Clause I, para. 3 of this Decision are determined:

  • all works are prohibited other than routine maintenance works and conservation and restoration works, including works designed to display the monument, with the approval of the Federal Ministry responsible for regional planning and under the expert supervision of the heritage protection authority of the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina,
  • the site and the building shall be protected from the effects of subterranean waters,
  • the foundations, walls and dome of the building shall be repaired and conserved,
  • the retaining walls of the ensemble shall be repaired and conserved,
  • the fountain shall be repaired and renovated,
  • research works and the restoration of the painted surfaces within the mosqueshall be carried out.

 

In order to restore the original appearance of the National Monument, and on the basis of a restoration project, the following works shall be carried out:

    • the iron fence of the mosque harem (courtyard) shall be replaced by a stone wall designed in harmony with the monument itself,
    • the abdesthana (ablutions fountain)  shall be removed or relocated outside the architectural ensemble,
    • the makeshift entrance porch of the mosque shall be removed.

IV

 

All executive and area development planning acts not in accordance with the provisions of this Decision are hereby revoked.

 

V

 

Everyone, and in particular the competent authorities of the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina, the Canton, and urban and municipal authorities, shall refrain from any action that might damage the National Monument specified in Clause I of this Decision or jeopardize the protection thereof.

 

VI

 

The Government of the Federation, the Federal Ministry responsible for regional planning, the Federation heritage protection authority, and the Municipal Authorities in charge of urban planning and land registry affairs, shall be notified of this Decision in order to carry out the measures stipulated in Articles II to V of this Decision, and the Authorized Municipal Court shall be notified for the purposes of registration in the Land Register.

 

VII

 

The elucidation and accompanying documentation form an integral part of this Decision, which may be viewed by interested parties on the premises or by accessing the website of the Commission http://www.aneks8komisija.com.ba/) 

 

VIII

 

Pursuant to Art. V Para 4 Annex 8 of the General Framework Agreement for Peace in Bosnia and Herzegovina, decisions of the Commission are final.

 

IX

 

On the date of adoption of this Decision, the National Monument shall be deleted from the Provisional List of National Monuments of Bosnia and Herzegovina (Official Gazette of BiH no. 33/02, Official Gazette of Republika Srpska no. 79/02, Official Gazette of the Federation of BiH no. 59/02, and Official Gazette of Brčko District BiH no. 4/03), where it featured under serial no. 295.

 

X

 

This Decision shall enter into force on the date of its adoption and shall be published in the Official Gazette of BiH.

 

This Decision has been adopted by the following members of the Commission: Zeynep Ahunbay, Amra Hadžimuhamedović, Dubravko Lovrenović, Ljiljana Ševo and Tina Wik.

 

No: 09-2-238/04-3

15 March 2005  

Sarajevo                                                                                                               

Chair of the Commission

Amra Hadžimuhamedović

 

E l u c i d a t i o n

 

I – INTRODUCTION

 

Pursuant to Article 2, paragraph 1 of the Law on the Implementation of the Decisions of the Commission to Preserve National Monuments, established pursuant to Annex 8 of the General Framework Agreement for Peace in Bosnia and Herzegovina, a “National Monument” is an item of public property proclaimed by the Commission to Preserve National Monuments to be a National Monument pursuant to Articles V and VI of Annex 8 of the General Framework Agreement for Peace in Bosnia and Herzegovina and property entered on the Provisional List of National Monuments of Bosnia and Herzegovina (Official Gazette of  BiH no. 33/02) until the Commission reaches a final decision on its status, as to which there is no time limit and regardless of whether a petition for the property in question has been submitted or not.

The Commission to Preserve National Monuments adopted a decision to add the Hajji Bali Bey (Kuršumlija) Mosque in Kladanj to the Provisional List of National Monuments of BiH, under serial No. 295.

In accordance with the provisions of the law and pursuant to Article V of Annex 8 and Article 35 of the Rules of Procedure of the Commission to Preserve National Monuments, the Commission proceeded to carry out the procedure for reaching a final decision to designate the Property as a National Monument

 

II – PROCEDURE PRIOR TO DECISION

 

In the procedure preceding the adoption of a final decision to proclaim the property a national monument, the following documentation was inspected:

  • Data on the current condition and use of the property, including a description and photographs, data of war damage, data on restoration or other works on the property, etc.
  • Documentation on the location of the property
  • and current owner and user of the property
  • Historical, architectural and other documentary material on the property, as set out in the bibliography forming part of this Decision.

The findings based on the review of the above documentation and the condition of the site are as follows:

 

1. Details of the property

Location

The architectural ensemble of the Kuršumlija (Hajji Bali Bey) Mosque in Kladanj is located on the right bank of the River Drinjača, on a site designated as c.p. 4035, owned by the Vakuf (perpetual foundation) of Hajji Bali Bey; c.m. Kladanj, Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Access to the architectural ensemble is from the south-east.

The main axis of the mosque is oriented northwest/southeast. The entrance is to the northwest. The mihrab wall is on the southeast. The the longer axis (head-foot bašluk) of the graves within the mosque harem is oriented northeast/southwest.

Historical Information

            The Kuršumlija(1) Mosque in Kladanj was built by a certain Hajji Bali Bey, on whom no information has survived, except for the fact that he left a considerable estate for the maintenance of this mosque. With the passage of time, the property was lost and the mosque was left without the resources for its maintenance.

The mosque was built 1544/1545 and is the only central dome mosque in Kladanj(2). 

 

2. Description of the property

The period when the Kuršumlija Mosque was built, but even more so the shape of its dome – a shallow calotte – indicates that it could have been built by one of the disciples of Mimar Hajrudin, i.e.in the early-Istanbul architectural style(3). 

The early-Istanbul architectural style emerged during the second half of the 15th and the first quarter of the 16th centuries, when, under the influence of Aya Sophia, edifices were built of more complex spatial layout. More and more, the architecture of mosques manifests a drive to have more space for the main prayer area, covered by a large dome, at times with an added semi-dome, while there also emerged gradually a gradual articulation in height of the various parts of the edifice. By the end of this stylistic period, the domes of the porch were being set somewhat lower than the contours of the main body, but the minaret remains relatively strong and tall until the end of this period; only rarely was it massive and stout. (Andrej Andrejević, Islamska monumentalna umetnost XVI veka u Jugoslaviji, p. 65.)

The characteristics of the Kuršumlija Mosque, apart its dome with a shallow calotte, are(4):

  • the absence of openings on the low drum(5),
  • the transition from the square ground plan of the mosque into the circular base of the dome achieved by pendentives, as opposed to the most common solution of the period – the tromp.

The mosque never had a porch built of durable materials(6).The reason for absence of a porch could be found in the availability of space on the small plot on which the monument was built.

Despite the fact that the Kuršumlija Mosque belong, in terms of its size, to the smaller and considerably more modest mosques, the fact is that it is the only domed mosque in this part of the country, while the traces of painted walls in the interior indicate the desire of its architect to achieve a more monumental expression. 

In terms of the concept of its spatial organisation, the mosque belongs to the single-space dome mosques without sofas and with a stone minaret.

The mosque is a cuboid edifice. Its exterior dimensions are 9,90 x 9,85 metres. The height of the mosque to the apex of the dome is 10,60 metres, and the minaret together with the alem (finial) is 25,50 metres high.

The mosque has walls made of quarry stone in lime mortar, 110m thick. The quarry stone is laid in relatively regular horizontal courses. The footings of the walls, as well as their corners, are made of larger dressed pieces of stone. The mosque walls are plastered on the inside, while on the outside the structure of the walls was left exposed. 

The foundations of the building consist of stone blocks at a depth of about 1,00 m(7).

The interior of the mosque is enclosed by four walls upon which the weight of the round dome rests. The transition from the square ground plan to the circular dome was effected by pendentives. The octagonal drum is a false drum, since the calotte rests on the pendentives and on the massive walls without its support. In the interior all four walls have shallow rebated arches the apex of which meets the moulded ring at the base of the dome.

The inside diameter of the dome is 7,60 m. The dome is 40 cm thick.

The drum, made of quarry stone in lime mortar, is 50 cm thick.

The minaret, which abuts against the mosque, rising 1.60 meters above it, has a rectangular base about 6,0 metres high. The next 2 metres form the transition from the square, with sides 2,25 metres long, to a polygon with the diameter of the inscribed circle of 1,80 metres. The fourteen-sided shaft of the minaret tapers slightly. The height of the minaret to the šerefe (balcony) is about 16,70 metres, to the roof approx. 23,0 metres, and of the minaret without the alem about 25,0 metres. 

The roof of the minaret, well as the dome, is clad with sheet lead. The windows on the façades are set in three horizontal rows. The first row, on all the façades except the entrance, has rectangular windows measuring approx. 80 x 125 cm (width and height). These windows have simple stone frames and wrought iron bars on the outside. There are no relieving arches above the windows nor wooden shutters on the inside.  The first row has two windows on the southeast, mihrab side, and one each on the southwest and northeast façades.  On the northwest, entrance façade, instead of a window there is a dolaf (niche, wall cupboard) on the inside.

The second horizontal row has windows approx. 80 cm wide and 155 cm high to the apex of the arch.  There are two windows on all the façades apart from the entrance.   The windows on the southeast façade are set in the same vertical axis as those of the first row.

The third row consists of only one window, arched and of the identical shape and size as those of the second row, set in the southeast façade, in the same vertical axis as the mihrab.

The mosque was built on a relatively small plot, and on extremely steep terrain. This is why two sides of the mosque, southeast and northeast ones, are “dug into” the terrain, so that there are high retaining walls on these sides. The space between the retaining walls and the mosque is 1,0 to 1,50 metres. All this meant that there was no room to add an entrance porch to the mosque, and the entrance itself remained hidden, practically invisible from all sides.

The entrance portal conceptually belongs to the third group of portals (division according to A. Andrejević, as set out in his Islamska monumentalna umetnost XVI veka u Jugoslaviji (Islamic Monumental Art in Yugoslavia in the 16th century). The portal, which measures 1,70 x 3,00 m, projects out from the wall surface by approx. 15 cm. The stone frame of the portal is of very simple form. The opening is round-arched. The tarih on the construction of this mosque is non-existent. When the mosque was reconstructed, in 1959, a memorial plaque was mounted, giving details of the builder, the year of building and reconstruction. The porch was also built on that occasion, made of concrete and set above the frame of the portal

The interior of the mosque is an almost regular cube. The sides measure 7,67 x 7,51 m, and the height of the wall up to the string course is 7,25 m. The transition from the cube to the dome is emphasized by a simple, painted string course 12 cm high. The height of the interior, measured from the floor to the apex of the dome, is 10,20 m.

The inside walls are plastered and whitewashed, while the mihrab, pointed arches and dome are painted and decorated.

Traces of painted decoration are now to be found only on parts of the dome. Around the windows there are barely visible traces of painted decoration that has been painted over at some time.

In the course of reconstruction works, in 1998, the interior of the mosque was plastered, and, on that occasion, the mihrab, the mouldings of the arches, and most of the dome were painted. Two shades of light-green were and gold were used for the mihrab, and light-blue, light-green and ochre yellow for the arch mouldings and most of the dome.

Parts of the earlier painted decoration were retained on the dome – the central circle of the dome, a series of flowers interlinked in a chain descending towards the edge of the dome, and the edge of the dome itself. The colours of the older painted decoration are greyish-blue, orange-red and black. It may be assumed from the colours and motifs that the old decoration was painted at the end of the 19th and the beginning of the 20th century (according to Prof. Zeynep Ahunbay).

Inside the building, along the entire front, entrance wall, there is a mahfil, measuring 7,67 x 2,60 m. A wooden flight of stairs leads to the mahfil.  Eight wooden pillars, square in cross-section, forming two rows, carry the structure of the mahfil. The railing of the mahfil is made of wooden uprights. The floor is made of wood.

The mahfil is divided into two sections. The semi-circular section for the muezzin is located next to the south-west wall, and is separated from the rest of the mahfil by four steps.  There is a cupboard in the enclosed space below it.

The mimber, which measures 3,00 x 0,80 m and approx. 5,50 m high to the top of the pyramidal canopy, is made of wood, and consists of three parts: a portal with the staircase and wooden stair-rail, the upper pyramidal canopy supported by four square pillars, and the triangular sides below the canopy and the stair-rail.

The mihrab area, which is 1,80 m wide and 3,0 m high, projects outwards from the wall face by 18 cm. There is a calligraphic inscription in gold in a semi-rectangular panel in the space between the 20 cm wide stone frame and the mihrab niche. The stone frame of the mihrab is painted in a watery-green hue, while the mihrab niche is light-green. The seven-sided mihrab niche, which is  0,86 m wide and 2,0 m high, has a simple vault, with no stalactite decoration, but is decorated only with gold stars. On both sides of the mihrab niche, up to 1,0 m, are gold relief decorations in the shape of pillars with hour-glasses at their bases and capitals.

Access to the minaret is from inside the mosque, via the mahfil. The fourteen-sided minaret, set on a square base, is plastered. Part of the minaret roof is decorated with a series of blind arcades painted green.

The Old or the Hajji Đurđihanuma Fountain

In the immediate vicinity of the entrance to the mosque harem is an old fountain known as the Hajji Đurđuhanuma Fountain(8), which was built as a musluk-ćesma (fountain with several taps). It consists of a musluk on a small retaining wall, covered by a slab, and with a large stone trough on which the musluk rests.

The trough is now at the street level.

The musluk is a small trough, located in a smaller area built into the fountain. The water coming from the water supply system flows directly to the musluk. Functionally, the musluk is similar to a flow-through terezije(9) – water flows through them and undergoes its final purification at this point.

The Hajji Đurđuhanuma fountain musluk has a polygonal stone roof(10). This roof that, terminating in a lead sphere, projects outwards by several centimetres over the fountain walls; this projection is known as prepust or sačak(11). 

The fountain, built of dressed stone, has two shallow niches terminating in pointed arches at the front (the mihrab of the fountain), with a small circular niche between them.  There is an iron ring on the projecting part of the roof, directly above the circular niche.

Graveyard adjacent to the mosque

            There are several tombstones (nišans) in the mosque harem. As a result of subsidence, most of them have sunk into the ground, while weathering has left the epitaphs on most of them them difficult to make out.

One of the tombstones, according to Mehmed Mujezinović, is the grave of Đozić Hafiz Salih effendi, son of Osman effendi, who was the imam of this mosque and who died in 1290 (1873) (12).

In the harem, near the angle of the southeast and southwest walls, there is a mejt-stone (a stone slab set on a lower stone pillar upon which the mejt – the body of the deceased – is laid during the funeral). 

 

3. Legal status to date

By Ruling of the Institute for the Protection of the Cultural, Historical and Natural Heritage of Bosnia and Herzegovina, in 1952, the building was placed under state protection and entered in the Register of Cultural Monuments.

The Hajji Bali Bey (Kuršumlija) Mosque in Kladanj was included on the Provisional List of National Monuments of the Commission to Preserve National Monuments under No. 295.

 

4. Research, Conservation and Restoration Works:

At some time, the mosque in Kladanj had a pent-roofed porch resting on the southwest wall of the mosque. (According to the current imam of the mosque, Enes effendi Hodžić). The porch was removed after WW I, around 1929. Traces of the metal supports are still visible on the mosque façade.

During WW I, most probably in 1917, the army of the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy removed the lead cladding of the roof to use for its own purposes. As a result, the mosque is now clad with wooden shingles(13). It remains unknown whether the wooden porch was built at that time.

During WW II the mosque building was damaged by detonations and shrapnel. The roof was in a state of dilapidation and the dome had begun to deteriorate.

Reconstruction works on the mosque reconstruction began only in 1959, under the supervision of Biško Mate of the Institute for the Protection of Cultural Monuments - Sarajevo. The extent or nature of the works is unknown. In the IVZ Glasnik of 1960, in an article published on the occasion of the opening ceremony of the mosque, Đozić Abdulah wrote: «...to save this beautiful building from demolition, so that thanks to this reconstruction its life has been prolonged for another several years, since it is now more solidly built than it used to be…»

In the 1980s an abdesthana was built next to the northeast wall of the mosque. Access to abdesthana is the same as to the mosque. Given the steep terrain, the abdesthana is entirely dug back into the ground and quite invisible from the outside.

In the same period, the stone wall of the harem was replaced with a simple iron fence, for unknown reasons(14). 

During the war in Bosnia and Herzegovina, in August 1995, the minaret received a direct hit and the part above the šerefe was demolished. In addition, minor cracks on the walls and the dome have become more visible with time. This is why, in 1998, the rehabilitation of the mosque structure and its partial reconstruction was undertaken.

The rehabilitation of the structure was led by Prof. Dr Hamid Dolarović, while the reconstruction of the architectural part was supervised by the Institute for the Protection of Cultural Monuments and Natural Heritage.

The structural rehabilitation of the monument entailed an inspection of the nature of the damage as well as a study of the foundations. The findings were used as the basis for the main architectural project of the rehabilitation of the mosque.

An on site inspection indicated the following.

  1. the geotechnical characteristics of the ground on which the mosque stands are assessed as favourable from the point of view of bearing capacity;
  2. despite this, with time, unequal subsidence has occurred under the mosque foundations, caused by the heterogeneous nature of the site on which the building stands, the age of the mosque and the process of subsidence;
  3. as a result, there is major subsidence under the mosque, particularly marked at the angle of the southeast and southwest walls;

The consequences of the condition of the mosque as seen on the walls were:

  1. the southwest wall, together with the minaret, is leaning vertically to the southeast wall. This is plain to see from the angle at which the building is leaning, of about 10-12 cm. The actual face of the southwest wall is leaning so that no damage to it can be seen;
  2. the southeast wall has suffered damage due to the torsion effect of of the movement of the south-west wall; the damage takes the shape of cracks at a distance of 3 to 4 m from the corner;
  3. the entrance, northwest wall has suffered minor damage visible in the immediate vicinity of the entrance, due to the effects of the southwest wall and the leaning of the minaret;
  4. the northeast wall has suffered minor damage where it meets the southeast wall;
  5. given that the dome rests symmetrically on all four walls, it has also suffered damage visible as cracks.

The rehabilitation measures envisaged by the architectural project provide for the following:

  1. the installation of three fixing elements for the concrete underpinnings of the foundations on the inside;
  2. the installation of seven fixing elements for the concrete underpinnings of the foundation on the outside
  3. the installation of four repères at the four corners of the building, after the rehabilitation works are completed, for the purpose of regular geodetic observation of the building;

During the installation of the fixing elements on the inside of the building, high levels of underground water were detected.

During rehabilitation and reconstruction works on the building in 1998 the following works were conducted:

  1. only one trial fixing element was laid for the concrete underpinnings of the foundations on the inside, close to the mimber;
  2. the stone flooring slabs were removed in order to level the ground and lay a hydro-insulation layer beneath them;
  3. a new wooden floor was laid in the mosque covering the original stone slabs;
  4. new mimber was made of oak to replace the old dilapidated one;
  5. a new one was mahfil made to replace the old dilapidated one;
  6. the interior of the mosque was whitewashed and painted using new colours;
  7. the part of the minaret above the šerefe was rebuilt using traditional building methods;
  8. new paving was laid on the paths in the mosque harem.

During the works on the mosque in 1998 a make-shift porch was also erected outside the entrance.

The research works on the painted decoration were not carried out.

 

5. Current condition of the property

Despite the recent rehabilitation works, numerous cracks can be seen on the building – both on the walls and on the dome.

Neither the rehabilitation, nor the measures recommended by the rehabilitation project in terms of regular geodetic observation were carried out.

During the works on the architectural reconstruction of the building, the original appearance of the mosque was not sufficiently taken into consideration. The mimber and mahfil were considerably altered(15). The colours of the paint used in the interior are unsuitable in terms of both composition and palette.

The interventions carried out during the 20th century have caused the building to lose much of its authentic appearance.

 

III – CONCLUSION

 

Applying the Criteria for the adoption of a decision on proclaiming an item of property a national monument (Official Gazette of BiH, nos. 33/02 and 15/03), the Commission has enacted the Decision cited above.

The Decision was based on the following criteria:

A.  Time frame

B.  Historical value

(the building is associated with a historical figure)

F. Townscape/ Landscape value

F.ii. meaning in the townscape

I. Completeness

I.i. physical coherence

I.ii. homogeneity

I.iii. completeness

I.iv. undamaged condition

 

The following documents form an integral part of this Decision:

o        Photo documentation

o        Drawings

 

Bibliography:

During the procedure to designate the architectural ensemble of the Kuršumlija (Hajji Bali bey) mosque in Kladanj as a national monument of Bosnia and Herzegovina the following works were consulted:

 

1939     Kreševljaković, Hamdija, Vodovodi i gradnje na vodi u starom Sarajevu (Water Supply Systems and Water-related Buildings in Old Sarajevo), ed. Gradska štedionica općine grada Sarajeva, Islamska dionička štamparija, Sarajevo, 1939.

 

1960     Đozić, Abdulah, Svečano otvorenje popravljene Kuršumlije džamije u Kladnju (Formal opening of the restored Kuršumlija mosque in Kladanj), article published in Glasnik Vrhovnog Islamskog Starješinstva, 1960, No. 7-9.

 

1984      Andrejević, Andrej, Islamska monumantalna umetnost XVI veka u Jugoslaviji – kupolne džamije (16th century Islamic Monumental Art in Yugoslavia – domed mosques), Faculty of Philosophy in Belgrade, Institute for History and Art, Serbian Academy of Science and Art, Balkan Studies Institute, Belgrade, 1984.

 

1998     Mujezinović, Mehmed, Islamska epigrafika Bosne i Hercegovine (Islamic Epigraphics in BiH), Vol. II, 3rd ed., Cultural Heritage Series, Sarajevo Publishing, 1998.

 

1998     Dolarović, Hamid, Izvedbeni projekat sanacije džamije Hadži Bali-bega – Kuršumlija u Kladnju (Architectural Project for the Reconstruction of the Hajji Bali Bey Mosque in Kladanj), 1998.

           

Documentation of the Institute for the Protection of Cultural Monuments of BiH

 

(1) «The Bali Bey Mosque is called the Kuršumlija Mosque because it was clad with lead», Mujezinović Mehmed, Islamska epigrafika BiH, 1998, Vol.  II, p. 145.

(2) Mujezinović Mehmed, Islamska epigrafika BiH, 1998, Vol. II, p. 145 and Đozić Abdulah, Svečano otvorenje popravljene Kuršumlije džamije u Kladnju, article published in the Glasnik Vrhovnog Islamskog Starješinstva, 1960, No. 7-9.

(3)  «It is built of stone, with a dome that is flattened from above, from which it may be  deduced that its is older than the domes designed by Mimar Sinan. The dome of the Bali Bey Mosque is almost identical to that of the Čekrekčija Mosque in Sarajevo (1526), so it is possible the same craftsman built both of these mosques.», Mujezinović Mehmed, Islamska epigrafika BiH, Vo. II, p. 145.

(4) Domes with a shallow calotte and relatively low in height are found in another three monuments in BiH: in the oldest domed mosque in Sarajevo, the Mustafa Bey Skenderpašić Mosque (built in 1518 and demolished by the mid-20th century), the Čekrekčinica Mosque in Sarajevo (built in 1526) and the Sinan Čauš Mosque in Livno (built in 1529). From A. Andrejević, Islamska monumentalna umetnost XVI veka u Jugoslaviji, p. 48.

(5) The reason for this is probably the height of the drum. In the Kuršumlija Mosque the drum is 1,05 m high, while in the Čekrekčinica Mosque , e.g., it is 1,97 m.

(6) The same feature, namely, that there is no porch built of durable materials, is found also in Sarajevo’s Čekrekčinica Mosque.

(7) Data taken from the architectural project for the reconstruction of the Hajji Bali Bey (Kuršumlija) Mosque in Kladanj by  Prof. Dr Hamid Dolarović.

(8) Mujezinović Mehmed, Islamska epigrafika BiH, vol. II, p. 145.       

(9)  «Terezije are  small basins, square or rectangular in shape, built of stone or travertine». They are used to collect water from a spring and distribute it through the water supply system. See Kreševljaković, Hamdija, Vodovodi i gradnje na vodi u starom Sarajevu, p. 11.

(10) «Af musluk with a polygonal roof is unique in our country», Mujezinović Mehmed, Islamska epigrafika BiH, II tom, p. 145.

(11) Prepust, or sačak (Gezims) is, according to Kreševljaković, a feature of finer fountains; see Kreševljaković, Hamdija, Vodovodi i gradnje na vodi u starom Sarajevu, p. 22.

(12) Mujezinović Mehmed, Islamska epigrafika BiH, II tom, p. 145.

(13) Đozić Abdulah, Svečano otvorenje popravljene Kuršumlije džamije u Kladnju (Opening Ceremony of Refurbished Kuršumlija Mosque in Kladanj), article published in Glasnik Vrhovnog Islamskog Starješinstva, 1960, No. 7-9.

(14) According to the current imam of this mosque, Enes effendi Hodžić, the former Republic Institute for Protection of Cultural and Historic Heritage – Sarajevo developed a project during the 1980s for a new stone harem wall. The project, however, was never carried out.

(15) Comparison made on the basis of the documentation kept by the Institute for the Protection of theHeritage in 1959.



KladanjKuršumlija (Hajji Bali Bey’s) mosqueKuršumlija mosque, 1974Kuršumlija mosque, 1996
EntranceGraveyard of the MosqueInterior of the MosqueDome - original decoration
South-east facade   


BiH jezici 
Commision to preserve national monuments © 2003. Design & Dev.: